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First-line managers' views of the long-term effects of clinical supervision: how does clinical supervision support and develop leadership in health care?
J Nurs Manag. 2005 May; 13(3):209-20.JN

Abstract

There have recently been several organizational changes that have challenged nursing managers in the Finnish health care system. First-line managers need support in their work because of organizational changes and scarce economic resources. One of these supportive measures is clinical supervision. A group of first-line managers in a Finnish University hospital participated in a 2-year clinical supervision intervention in 1999-2000. The managers' perceptions of the clinical supervision were followed up twice during the intervention and 1 year after (2001). The aim of this study is to describe how the first-line managers saw the future effects of the clinical supervision intervention 1 year after its termination. At the beginning of the intervention, the number of participating nursing managers was 32. The number of respondents in this study 1 year (2001) after the clinical supervision was 11. Data was collected using empathy-based stories, which involved writing short essays. The respondents received orientation and a script to assist them in the writing of essays. The stories were analysed qualitatively by categorizing the responses by themes. The managers deemed that clinical supervision had, in the 3-year time frame, positive long-term effects on their leadership and communication skills, the desire for self-development, self-knowledge and coping. Managers believed that in the long run, clinical supervision would provide them with a broader perspective on work and would enhance the use of clinical supervision as a supportive measure among co-workers. First-line managers expect clinical supervision to have long-term positive effects on their work and coping. Empathy-based stories, as a method, were found suited to studies, which aim to obtaining future-oriented knowledge.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Nursing, University of Northern British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada. hyrkask@unbc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15819833

Citation

Hyrkäs, Kristiina, et al. "First-line Managers' Views of the Long-term Effects of Clinical Supervision: How Does Clinical Supervision Support and Develop Leadership in Health Care?" Journal of Nursing Management, vol. 13, no. 3, 2005, pp. 209-20.
Hyrkäs K, Appelqvist-Schmidlechner K, Kivimäki K. First-line managers' views of the long-term effects of clinical supervision: how does clinical supervision support and develop leadership in health care? J Nurs Manag. 2005;13(3):209-20.
Hyrkäs, K., Appelqvist-Schmidlechner, K., & Kivimäki, K. (2005). First-line managers' views of the long-term effects of clinical supervision: how does clinical supervision support and develop leadership in health care? Journal of Nursing Management, 13(3), 209-20.
Hyrkäs K, Appelqvist-Schmidlechner K, Kivimäki K. First-line Managers' Views of the Long-term Effects of Clinical Supervision: How Does Clinical Supervision Support and Develop Leadership in Health Care. J Nurs Manag. 2005;13(3):209-20. PubMed PMID: 15819833.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - First-line managers' views of the long-term effects of clinical supervision: how does clinical supervision support and develop leadership in health care? AU - Hyrkäs,Kristiina, AU - Appelqvist-Schmidlechner,Kaija, AU - Kivimäki,Kirsti, PY - 2005/4/12/pubmed PY - 2005/6/21/medline PY - 2005/4/12/entrez SP - 209 EP - 20 JF - Journal of nursing management JO - J Nurs Manag VL - 13 IS - 3 N2 - There have recently been several organizational changes that have challenged nursing managers in the Finnish health care system. First-line managers need support in their work because of organizational changes and scarce economic resources. One of these supportive measures is clinical supervision. A group of first-line managers in a Finnish University hospital participated in a 2-year clinical supervision intervention in 1999-2000. The managers' perceptions of the clinical supervision were followed up twice during the intervention and 1 year after (2001). The aim of this study is to describe how the first-line managers saw the future effects of the clinical supervision intervention 1 year after its termination. At the beginning of the intervention, the number of participating nursing managers was 32. The number of respondents in this study 1 year (2001) after the clinical supervision was 11. Data was collected using empathy-based stories, which involved writing short essays. The respondents received orientation and a script to assist them in the writing of essays. The stories were analysed qualitatively by categorizing the responses by themes. The managers deemed that clinical supervision had, in the 3-year time frame, positive long-term effects on their leadership and communication skills, the desire for self-development, self-knowledge and coping. Managers believed that in the long run, clinical supervision would provide them with a broader perspective on work and would enhance the use of clinical supervision as a supportive measure among co-workers. First-line managers expect clinical supervision to have long-term positive effects on their work and coping. Empathy-based stories, as a method, were found suited to studies, which aim to obtaining future-oriented knowledge. SN - 0966-0429 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15819833/First_line_managers'_views_of_the_long_term_effects_of_clinical_supervision:_how_does_clinical_supervision_support_and_develop_leadership_in_health_care L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2834.2004.00522.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -