Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effects of oral potassium supplementation on acid-base status and plasma ion concentrations of horses during endurance exercise.
Am J Vet Res. 2005 Mar; 66(3):466-73.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare effects of oral supplementation with an experimental potassium-free sodium-abundant electrolyte mixture (EM-K) with that of oral supplementation with commercial potassium-rich mixtures (EM+K) on acid-base status and plasma ion concentrations in horses during an 80-km endurance ride.

ANIMALS

46 healthy horses.

PROCEDURE

Blood samples were collected before the ride; at 21-, 37-, 56-, and 80-km inspection points; and during recovery (ie, 30-minute period after the ride). Consumed electrolytes were recorded. Blood was analyzed for pH, PvCO2, and Hct, and plasma was analyzed for Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+, Mg2+, lactate, albumin, phosphate, and total protein concentrations. Plasma concentrations of H+ and HCO3-, the strong ion difference (SID), and osmolarity were calculated.

RESULTS

34 (17 EM-K and 17 EM+K treated) horses finished the ride. Potassium intake was 33 g less and Na+ intake was 36 g greater for EM-K-treated horses, compared with EM+K-treated horses. With increasing distance, plasma osmolarity; H+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, phosphate, lactate, total protein, and albumin concentrations; and PvCO2 and Hct were increased in all horses. Plasma HCO3-, Ca2+, and Cl- concentrations were decreased. Plasma H+ concentration was significantly lower in EM-K-treated horses, compared with EM+K-treated horses. Plasma K+ concentrations at the 80-km inspection point and during recovery were significantly less in EM-K-treated horses, compared with EM+K-treated horses.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Increases in plasma H+ and K+ concentrations in this endurance ride were moderate and unlikely to contribute to signs of muscle fatigue and hyperexcitability in horses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal and Poultry Science, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15822592

Citation

Hess, Tanja M., et al. "Effects of Oral Potassium Supplementation On Acid-base Status and Plasma Ion Concentrations of Horses During Endurance Exercise." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 66, no. 3, 2005, pp. 466-73.
Hess TM, Kronfeld DS, Williams CA, et al. Effects of oral potassium supplementation on acid-base status and plasma ion concentrations of horses during endurance exercise. Am J Vet Res. 2005;66(3):466-73.
Hess, T. M., Kronfeld, D. S., Williams, C. A., Waldron, J. N., Graham-Thiers, P. M., Greiwe-Crandell, K., Lopes, M. A., & Harris, P. A. (2005). Effects of oral potassium supplementation on acid-base status and plasma ion concentrations of horses during endurance exercise. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 66(3), 466-73.
Hess TM, et al. Effects of Oral Potassium Supplementation On Acid-base Status and Plasma Ion Concentrations of Horses During Endurance Exercise. Am J Vet Res. 2005;66(3):466-73. PubMed PMID: 15822592.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of oral potassium supplementation on acid-base status and plasma ion concentrations of horses during endurance exercise. AU - Hess,Tanja M, AU - Kronfeld,David S, AU - Williams,Carey A, AU - Waldron,Jeannie N, AU - Graham-Thiers,Patricia M, AU - Greiwe-Crandell,Kathleen, AU - Lopes,Marco A, AU - Harris,Pat A, PY - 2005/4/13/pubmed PY - 2005/5/3/medline PY - 2005/4/13/entrez SP - 466 EP - 73 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am. J. Vet. Res. VL - 66 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare effects of oral supplementation with an experimental potassium-free sodium-abundant electrolyte mixture (EM-K) with that of oral supplementation with commercial potassium-rich mixtures (EM+K) on acid-base status and plasma ion concentrations in horses during an 80-km endurance ride. ANIMALS: 46 healthy horses. PROCEDURE: Blood samples were collected before the ride; at 21-, 37-, 56-, and 80-km inspection points; and during recovery (ie, 30-minute period after the ride). Consumed electrolytes were recorded. Blood was analyzed for pH, PvCO2, and Hct, and plasma was analyzed for Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+, Mg2+, lactate, albumin, phosphate, and total protein concentrations. Plasma concentrations of H+ and HCO3-, the strong ion difference (SID), and osmolarity were calculated. RESULTS: 34 (17 EM-K and 17 EM+K treated) horses finished the ride. Potassium intake was 33 g less and Na+ intake was 36 g greater for EM-K-treated horses, compared with EM+K-treated horses. With increasing distance, plasma osmolarity; H+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, phosphate, lactate, total protein, and albumin concentrations; and PvCO2 and Hct were increased in all horses. Plasma HCO3-, Ca2+, and Cl- concentrations were decreased. Plasma H+ concentration was significantly lower in EM-K-treated horses, compared with EM+K-treated horses. Plasma K+ concentrations at the 80-km inspection point and during recovery were significantly less in EM-K-treated horses, compared with EM+K-treated horses. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Increases in plasma H+ and K+ concentrations in this endurance ride were moderate and unlikely to contribute to signs of muscle fatigue and hyperexcitability in horses. SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15822592/Effects_of_oral_potassium_supplementation_on_acid_base_status_and_plasma_ion_concentrations_of_horses_during_endurance_exercise_ L2 - http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/full/10.2460/ajvr.2005.66.466?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -