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Serum adiponectin concentration and cardiovascular risk factors in climacteric women.
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2005 Feb; 20(2):68-73.GE

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Adiponectin plays a significant role in the modulation of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. We attempted to evaluate the relationship between adiponectin level and parameters of the menopausal metabolic syndrome: body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, lipid profile and insulin resistance indices.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

Thirty-two women and ten men aged 40-63 years were included. The percentage of body fat and of abdominal fat deposits were measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-a (TNFalpha) and leptin were measured with commercially available radioimmunoassay kits. To exclude the influence of nutritional factors on adiponectin secretion, diet content was analysed in the preceding three days.

RESULTS

Postmenopausal non-obese women had a non-significantly lower level of adiponectin compared with premenopausal women of corresponding body mass. Serum adiponectin level was significantly lower in postmenopausal obese women than in non-obese women (p = 0.0023). Men with similar age and body mass to the women had the lowest level of adiponectin (p = 0.06). Three months of estrogen replacement therapy in women with surgical menopause did not significantly change the serum level of adiponectin. We found a negative correlation of adiponectin with leptin, insulin resistance index and total cholesterol, and a positive correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Adiponectin level was negatively correlated with free testosterone, but we did not find such a relationship with estradiol. There was no correlation of adiponectin level with TNFalpha; however, serum TNFalpha correlated positively with leptin. The dietary analysis showed no differences between the diets of obese and non-obese women over the preceding three days. Moreover, mean diastolic and systolic blood pressures were noted to be significantly lower in premenopausal women than in postmenopausal non-obese women (p = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that adiponectin could be a marker of risk for developing menopausal metabolic syndrome. Moreover, it is possible that sex steroids have an influence on adiponectin secretion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland. milewicz@endo.am.wroc.plNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15823824

Citation

Milewicz, Andrzej, et al. "Serum Adiponectin Concentration and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Climacteric Women." Gynecological Endocrinology : the Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, vol. 20, no. 2, 2005, pp. 68-73.
Milewicz A, Zatonska K, Demissie M, et al. Serum adiponectin concentration and cardiovascular risk factors in climacteric women. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2005;20(2):68-73.
Milewicz, A., Zatonska, K., Demissie, M., Jêdrzejuk, D., Dunajska, K., Ilow, R., & Lwow, F. (2005). Serum adiponectin concentration and cardiovascular risk factors in climacteric women. Gynecological Endocrinology : the Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, 20(2), 68-73.
Milewicz A, et al. Serum Adiponectin Concentration and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Climacteric Women. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2005;20(2):68-73. PubMed PMID: 15823824.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum adiponectin concentration and cardiovascular risk factors in climacteric women. AU - Milewicz,Andrzej, AU - Zatonska,Katarzyna, AU - Demissie,Marek, AU - Jêdrzejuk,Diana, AU - Dunajska,Katarzyna, AU - Ilow,Rafał, AU - Lwow,Felicja, PY - 2005/4/13/pubmed PY - 2005/8/23/medline PY - 2005/4/13/entrez SP - 68 EP - 73 JF - Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology JO - Gynecol. Endocrinol. VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Adiponectin plays a significant role in the modulation of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. We attempted to evaluate the relationship between adiponectin level and parameters of the menopausal metabolic syndrome: body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, lipid profile and insulin resistance indices. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Thirty-two women and ten men aged 40-63 years were included. The percentage of body fat and of abdominal fat deposits were measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-a (TNFalpha) and leptin were measured with commercially available radioimmunoassay kits. To exclude the influence of nutritional factors on adiponectin secretion, diet content was analysed in the preceding three days. RESULTS: Postmenopausal non-obese women had a non-significantly lower level of adiponectin compared with premenopausal women of corresponding body mass. Serum adiponectin level was significantly lower in postmenopausal obese women than in non-obese women (p = 0.0023). Men with similar age and body mass to the women had the lowest level of adiponectin (p = 0.06). Three months of estrogen replacement therapy in women with surgical menopause did not significantly change the serum level of adiponectin. We found a negative correlation of adiponectin with leptin, insulin resistance index and total cholesterol, and a positive correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Adiponectin level was negatively correlated with free testosterone, but we did not find such a relationship with estradiol. There was no correlation of adiponectin level with TNFalpha; however, serum TNFalpha correlated positively with leptin. The dietary analysis showed no differences between the diets of obese and non-obese women over the preceding three days. Moreover, mean diastolic and systolic blood pressures were noted to be significantly lower in premenopausal women than in postmenopausal non-obese women (p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that adiponectin could be a marker of risk for developing menopausal metabolic syndrome. Moreover, it is possible that sex steroids have an influence on adiponectin secretion. SN - 0951-3590 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15823824/Serum_adiponectin_concentration_and_cardiovascular_risk_factors_in_climacteric_women_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09513590400020989 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -