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Physical activity and risk of endometrial cancer: a report from the Shanghai endometrial cancer study.

Abstract

We evaluated the type and amount of physical activity associated with risk of endometrial cancer. In this population-based case-control study, in-person interviews were completed among 832 incident endometrial cancer cases and 846 age-matched controls. Physical activity from exercise, household activities, and transportation was assessed in adolescence and adulthood, as was lifetime occupational activity. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence limits (95% CL). Women reporting exercise participation in both adolescence and adulthood were at nearly a 40% reduced risk (OR, 0.63; 95% CL, 0.42-0.95), compared with women reporting no exercise in either life period. Postmenopausal women who initiated exercise in adulthood were also at reduced risk (OR, 0.76; 95% CL, 0.56-1.02). Reductions in risk were also observed for common lifestyle activities, including household activity (both life periods) and walking for transportation (adulthood). Examination of the independent and combined effect of exercise and lifestyle activities revealed that women with less active lifestyles but who reported exercise were at 35% reduced risk (OR, 0.65; 95% CL, 0.41-1.02), whereas nonexercisers with more active lifestyles were at 40% to 45% reduced risk. These findings suggest that both lifestyle activities of lower intensity (e.g., walking and doing household chores) and intentional exercise can reduce endometrial cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Medical Center East, Suite 6100, Nashville, TN 37232-8300, USA. charles.matthews@vanderbilt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15824143

Citation

Matthews, Charles E., et al. "Physical Activity and Risk of Endometrial Cancer: a Report From the Shanghai Endometrial Cancer Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 14, no. 4, 2005, pp. 779-85.
Matthews CE, Xu WH, Zheng W, et al. Physical activity and risk of endometrial cancer: a report from the Shanghai endometrial cancer study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005;14(4):779-85.
Matthews, C. E., Xu, W. H., Zheng, W., Gao, Y. T., Ruan, Z. X., Cheng, J. R., ... Shu, X. O. (2005). Physical activity and risk of endometrial cancer: a report from the Shanghai endometrial cancer study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 14(4), pp. 779-85.
Matthews CE, et al. Physical Activity and Risk of Endometrial Cancer: a Report From the Shanghai Endometrial Cancer Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005;14(4):779-85. PubMed PMID: 15824143.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical activity and risk of endometrial cancer: a report from the Shanghai endometrial cancer study. AU - Matthews,Charles E, AU - Xu,Wang Hong, AU - Zheng,Wei, AU - Gao,Yu Tang, AU - Ruan,Zhi Xian, AU - Cheng,Jia Rong, AU - Xiang,Yong Bing, AU - Shu,Xiao Ou, PY - 2005/4/13/pubmed PY - 2005/6/29/medline PY - 2005/4/13/entrez SP - 779 EP - 85 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 14 IS - 4 N2 - We evaluated the type and amount of physical activity associated with risk of endometrial cancer. In this population-based case-control study, in-person interviews were completed among 832 incident endometrial cancer cases and 846 age-matched controls. Physical activity from exercise, household activities, and transportation was assessed in adolescence and adulthood, as was lifetime occupational activity. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence limits (95% CL). Women reporting exercise participation in both adolescence and adulthood were at nearly a 40% reduced risk (OR, 0.63; 95% CL, 0.42-0.95), compared with women reporting no exercise in either life period. Postmenopausal women who initiated exercise in adulthood were also at reduced risk (OR, 0.76; 95% CL, 0.56-1.02). Reductions in risk were also observed for common lifestyle activities, including household activity (both life periods) and walking for transportation (adulthood). Examination of the independent and combined effect of exercise and lifestyle activities revealed that women with less active lifestyles but who reported exercise were at 35% reduced risk (OR, 0.65; 95% CL, 0.41-1.02), whereas nonexercisers with more active lifestyles were at 40% to 45% reduced risk. These findings suggest that both lifestyle activities of lower intensity (e.g., walking and doing household chores) and intentional exercise can reduce endometrial cancer risk. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15824143/Physical_activity_and_risk_of_endometrial_cancer:_a_report_from_the_Shanghai_endometrial_cancer_study_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15824143 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -