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Obesity, weight change, hypertension, diuretic use, and risk of gout in men: the health professionals follow-up study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Limited prospective information exists on the relation between obesity and weight change and the risk of gout. Similarly, both hypertension and diuretic use have been considered risk factors for gout; however, their independent contributions have not been established prospectively.

METHODS

We prospectively examined over a 12-year period (1986-1998) the relation between adiposity, weight change, hypertension, and diuretic use and incident gout in 47,150 male participants with no history of gout at baseline. We used a supplementary questionnaire to ascertain the American College of Rheumatology criteria for gout.

RESULTS

During 12 years we documented 730 confirmed incident cases of gout. Compared with men with a body mass index (BMI) of 21 to 22.9, the multivariate relative risks (RRs) of gout were 1.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-2.65) for men with a BMI of 25 to 29.9, 2.33 (95% CI, 1.62-3.36) for men with a BMI of 30 to 34.9, and 2.97 (95% CI, 1.73-5.10) for men with a BMI of 35 or greater (P for trend <.001). Compared with men who had maintained their weight (+/-4 lb) since age 21 years, the multivariate RR of gout for men who had gained 30 lb or more since age 21 years was 1.99 (95% CI, 1.49-2.66). In contrast, the multivariate RR for men who had lost 10 lb or more since the study baseline was 0.61 (95% CI, 0.40-0.92). The multivariate RRs of gout were 2.31 (95% CI, 1.96-2.72) for the presence of hypertension and 1.77 (95% CI, 1.42-2.20) for diuretic use.

CONCLUSIONS

Higher adiposity and weight gain are strong risk factors for gout in men, while weight loss is protective. Hypertension and diuretic use are also important independent risk factors for gout.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, MA 02114, USA. hchoi@partners.org

    , ,

    Source

    Archives of internal medicine 165:7 2005 Apr 11 pg 742-8

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Body Mass Index
    Diuretics
    Follow-Up Studies
    Gout
    Health Personnel
    Humans
    Hypertension
    Incidence
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Weight Gain

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15824292

    Citation

    Choi, Hyon K., et al. "Obesity, Weight Change, Hypertension, Diuretic Use, and Risk of Gout in Men: the Health Professionals Follow-up Study." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 165, no. 7, 2005, pp. 742-8.
    Choi HK, Atkinson K, Karlson EW, et al. Obesity, weight change, hypertension, diuretic use, and risk of gout in men: the health professionals follow-up study. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(7):742-8.
    Choi, H. K., Atkinson, K., Karlson, E. W., & Curhan, G. (2005). Obesity, weight change, hypertension, diuretic use, and risk of gout in men: the health professionals follow-up study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165(7), pp. 742-8.
    Choi HK, et al. Obesity, Weight Change, Hypertension, Diuretic Use, and Risk of Gout in Men: the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Arch Intern Med. 2005 Apr 11;165(7):742-8. PubMed PMID: 15824292.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity, weight change, hypertension, diuretic use, and risk of gout in men: the health professionals follow-up study. AU - Choi,Hyon K, AU - Atkinson,Karen, AU - Karlson,Elizabeth W, AU - Curhan,Gary, PY - 2005/4/13/pubmed PY - 2005/5/6/medline PY - 2005/4/13/entrez SP - 742 EP - 8 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 165 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Limited prospective information exists on the relation between obesity and weight change and the risk of gout. Similarly, both hypertension and diuretic use have been considered risk factors for gout; however, their independent contributions have not been established prospectively. METHODS: We prospectively examined over a 12-year period (1986-1998) the relation between adiposity, weight change, hypertension, and diuretic use and incident gout in 47,150 male participants with no history of gout at baseline. We used a supplementary questionnaire to ascertain the American College of Rheumatology criteria for gout. RESULTS: During 12 years we documented 730 confirmed incident cases of gout. Compared with men with a body mass index (BMI) of 21 to 22.9, the multivariate relative risks (RRs) of gout were 1.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-2.65) for men with a BMI of 25 to 29.9, 2.33 (95% CI, 1.62-3.36) for men with a BMI of 30 to 34.9, and 2.97 (95% CI, 1.73-5.10) for men with a BMI of 35 or greater (P for trend <.001). Compared with men who had maintained their weight (+/-4 lb) since age 21 years, the multivariate RR of gout for men who had gained 30 lb or more since age 21 years was 1.99 (95% CI, 1.49-2.66). In contrast, the multivariate RR for men who had lost 10 lb or more since the study baseline was 0.61 (95% CI, 0.40-0.92). The multivariate RRs of gout were 2.31 (95% CI, 1.96-2.72) for the presence of hypertension and 1.77 (95% CI, 1.42-2.20) for diuretic use. CONCLUSIONS: Higher adiposity and weight gain are strong risk factors for gout in men, while weight loss is protective. Hypertension and diuretic use are also important independent risk factors for gout. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15824292/Obesity_weight_change_hypertension_diuretic_use_and_risk_of_gout_in_men:_the_health_professionals_follow_up_study_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.165.7.742 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -