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Obesity, regional body fat distribution, and the metabolic syndrome in older men and women.
Arch Intern Med. 2005 Apr 11; 165(7):777-83.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The metabolic syndrome is a disorder that includes dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension and is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We determined whether patterns of regional fat deposition are associated with metabolic syndrome in older adults.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study was performed that included a random, population-based, volunteer sample of Medicare-eligible adults within the general communities of Pittsburgh, Pa, and Memphis, Tenn. The subjects consisted of 3035 men and women aged 70 to 79 years, of whom 41.7% were black. Metabolic syndrome was defined by Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, including serum triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, glucose level, blood pressure, and waist circumference. Visceral, subcutaneous abdominal, intermuscular, and subcutaneous thigh adipose tissue was measured by computed tomography.

RESULTS

Visceral adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome in men who were of normal weight (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 2.1, 1.6-2.9), overweight (1.8, 1.5-2.1), and obese (1.2, 1.0-1.5), and in women who were of normal weight (3.3, 2.4-4.6), overweight (2.4, 2.0-3.0), and obese (1.7, 1.4-2.1), adjusting for race. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome only in normal-weight men (1.3, 1.1-1.7). Intermuscular adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome in normal-weight (2.3, 1.6-3.5) and overweight (1.2, 1.1-1.4) men. In contrast, subcutaneous thigh adipose tissue was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome in obese men (0.9, 0.8-1.0) and women (0.9, 0.9-1.0).

CONCLUSION

In addition to general obesity, the distribution of body fat is independently associated with the metabolic syndrome in older men and women, particularly among those of normal body weight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. bgood@pitt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15824297

Citation

Goodpaster, Bret H., et al. "Obesity, Regional Body Fat Distribution, and the Metabolic Syndrome in Older Men and Women." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 165, no. 7, 2005, pp. 777-83.
Goodpaster BH, Krishnaswami S, Harris TB, et al. Obesity, regional body fat distribution, and the metabolic syndrome in older men and women. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(7):777-83.
Goodpaster, B. H., Krishnaswami, S., Harris, T. B., Katsiaras, A., Kritchevsky, S. B., Simonsick, E. M., Nevitt, M., Holvoet, P., & Newman, A. B. (2005). Obesity, regional body fat distribution, and the metabolic syndrome in older men and women. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165(7), 777-83.
Goodpaster BH, et al. Obesity, Regional Body Fat Distribution, and the Metabolic Syndrome in Older Men and Women. Arch Intern Med. 2005 Apr 11;165(7):777-83. PubMed PMID: 15824297.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity, regional body fat distribution, and the metabolic syndrome in older men and women. AU - Goodpaster,Bret H, AU - Krishnaswami,Shanthi, AU - Harris,Tamara B, AU - Katsiaras,Andreas, AU - Kritchevsky,Steven B, AU - Simonsick,Eleanor M, AU - Nevitt,Michael, AU - Holvoet,Paul, AU - Newman,Anne B, PY - 2005/4/13/pubmed PY - 2005/5/6/medline PY - 2005/4/13/entrez SP - 777 EP - 83 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 165 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The metabolic syndrome is a disorder that includes dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension and is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We determined whether patterns of regional fat deposition are associated with metabolic syndrome in older adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed that included a random, population-based, volunteer sample of Medicare-eligible adults within the general communities of Pittsburgh, Pa, and Memphis, Tenn. The subjects consisted of 3035 men and women aged 70 to 79 years, of whom 41.7% were black. Metabolic syndrome was defined by Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, including serum triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, glucose level, blood pressure, and waist circumference. Visceral, subcutaneous abdominal, intermuscular, and subcutaneous thigh adipose tissue was measured by computed tomography. RESULTS: Visceral adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome in men who were of normal weight (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 2.1, 1.6-2.9), overweight (1.8, 1.5-2.1), and obese (1.2, 1.0-1.5), and in women who were of normal weight (3.3, 2.4-4.6), overweight (2.4, 2.0-3.0), and obese (1.7, 1.4-2.1), adjusting for race. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome only in normal-weight men (1.3, 1.1-1.7). Intermuscular adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome in normal-weight (2.3, 1.6-3.5) and overweight (1.2, 1.1-1.4) men. In contrast, subcutaneous thigh adipose tissue was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome in obese men (0.9, 0.8-1.0) and women (0.9, 0.9-1.0). CONCLUSION: In addition to general obesity, the distribution of body fat is independently associated with the metabolic syndrome in older men and women, particularly among those of normal body weight. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15824297/Obesity_regional_body_fat_distribution_and_the_metabolic_syndrome_in_older_men_and_women_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.165.7.777 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -