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Lower-body fat mass as an independent marker of insulin sensitivity--the role of adiponectin.
Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jun; 29(6):624-31.IJ

Abstract

AIMS

To study the association between lower-body fat and estimates of whole-body insulin sensitivity in middle-aged men with and without a history of juvenile onset obesity, and to determine the possible mediating role of fasting serum adiponectin level as an insulin-sensitizing peptide.

METHODS

A total of 401 men aged 39-65 y, body mass index 18-54 kg/m2, participated in the study. The following variables were measured on the study participants: regional body fat distribution as assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, abdominal sagittal diameter, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), physical activity, fasting and post-glucose load levels of plasma glucose, serum insulin, and blood non-esterified fatty acid plus fasting levels of serum adiponectin and HbA1c.

RESULTS

Lower-body fat mass was positively associated with insulin sensitivity as estimated by Matsudas index also after adjusting for age, lean tissue mass, trunkal fat mass, weight changes since draft board examination, VO2max and the level of physical activity. In a subgroup of men selected for a large lower-body fat mass, fasting serum insulin concentration was 24% lower (P<0.01) and fasting serum adiponectin 33% higher (P<0.005) compared to a subgroup of men with a small lower-body fat mass but with similar trunkal fat mass.

CONCLUSION

Lower-body fat mass is positively associated with an estimate of insulin sensitivity independently of trunkal fat mass in both lean and obese middle-aged men and this effect could partly be statistically explained by variations in serum adiponectin levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Nutrition, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark. BBU@KVL.DKNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15824752

Citation

Buemann, B, et al. "Lower-body Fat Mass as an Independent Marker of Insulin Sensitivity--the Role of Adiponectin." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 29, no. 6, 2005, pp. 624-31.
Buemann B, Sørensen TI, Pedersen O, et al. Lower-body fat mass as an independent marker of insulin sensitivity--the role of adiponectin. Int J Obes (Lond). 2005;29(6):624-31.
Buemann, B., Sørensen, T. I., Pedersen, O., Black, E., Holst, C., Toubro, S., Echwald, S., Holst, J. J., Rasmussen, C., & Astrup, A. (2005). Lower-body fat mass as an independent marker of insulin sensitivity--the role of adiponectin. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 29(6), 624-31.
Buemann B, et al. Lower-body Fat Mass as an Independent Marker of Insulin Sensitivity--the Role of Adiponectin. Int J Obes (Lond). 2005;29(6):624-31. PubMed PMID: 15824752.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lower-body fat mass as an independent marker of insulin sensitivity--the role of adiponectin. AU - Buemann,B, AU - Sørensen,T I A, AU - Pedersen,O, AU - Black,E, AU - Holst,C, AU - Toubro,S, AU - Echwald,S, AU - Holst,J J, AU - Rasmussen,C, AU - Astrup,A, PY - 2005/4/13/pubmed PY - 2005/9/21/medline PY - 2005/4/13/entrez SP - 624 EP - 31 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 29 IS - 6 N2 - AIMS: To study the association between lower-body fat and estimates of whole-body insulin sensitivity in middle-aged men with and without a history of juvenile onset obesity, and to determine the possible mediating role of fasting serum adiponectin level as an insulin-sensitizing peptide. METHODS: A total of 401 men aged 39-65 y, body mass index 18-54 kg/m2, participated in the study. The following variables were measured on the study participants: regional body fat distribution as assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, abdominal sagittal diameter, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), physical activity, fasting and post-glucose load levels of plasma glucose, serum insulin, and blood non-esterified fatty acid plus fasting levels of serum adiponectin and HbA1c. RESULTS: Lower-body fat mass was positively associated with insulin sensitivity as estimated by Matsudas index also after adjusting for age, lean tissue mass, trunkal fat mass, weight changes since draft board examination, VO2max and the level of physical activity. In a subgroup of men selected for a large lower-body fat mass, fasting serum insulin concentration was 24% lower (P<0.01) and fasting serum adiponectin 33% higher (P<0.005) compared to a subgroup of men with a small lower-body fat mass but with similar trunkal fat mass. CONCLUSION: Lower-body fat mass is positively associated with an estimate of insulin sensitivity independently of trunkal fat mass in both lean and obese middle-aged men and this effect could partly be statistically explained by variations in serum adiponectin levels. SN - 0307-0565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15824752/Lower_body_fat_mass_as_an_independent_marker_of_insulin_sensitivity__the_role_of_adiponectin_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802929 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -