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G-induced loss of consciousness: case-control study of 78 G-Locs in the F-15, F-16, and A-10.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005 Apr; 76(4):370-4.AS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

This study determined the trends of reported G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) mishaps from 1980--1999, and determined potential risk factors in pilot characteristics; specifically, 30/60/ 90-h and sortie history, total flight hours, total hours in the aircraft, age, height, weight, and BMI.

METHODS

Using aircraft malfunction mishaps to reflect a cross-section of USAF pilots, potential risk factors were determined using a case-control method; cases were all G-LOC mishaps and controls were aircraft malfunction mishaps. The data consisted of 2002 mishap pilots in the history of the F-16, F-15, F-15E, and A-10 from 1980-1999.

RESULTS

During this time, G-LOCs represented only 2.5% of all mishaps. The mean engagement number for G-LOC mishaps was three at an average of 8 Gs. A poor anti-G straining maneuver was cited in 72% of the mishaps, fatigue and G-suit malfunction in 19%, low G-tolerance at 14%, and 37% were student pilots. Within pilot characteristics, only two factors were found to be statistically significant: the time in the aircraft and pilot age. In the F-16, there was a 3.5 times greater chance of experiencing a G-LOC mishap if the pilot had less than 600 h in the aircraft [3.5 (1.7-7.2, 95%CI)], and a 9.5 times greater chance in the F-15 [9.5 (2.2-41.9, 95%CI)]. There was a 4.5 times greater chance of experiencing a G-LOC mishap if under the age of 30 in the F-16 [4.5 (2.3-8.5, 95% CI)] and a 3 times greater chance in the F-15 [2.8 (1.2-6.8, 95% CI)].

DISCUSSION

Though it is difficult to predict who will experience G-LOC, emphasis on prevention must be concentrated in training and in pilots new to the aircraft.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. Nereyda.Sevilla@osan.af.milNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15828637

Citation

Sevilla, Nereyda L., and John W. Gardner. "G-induced Loss of Consciousness: Case-control Study of 78 G-Locs in the F-15, F-16, and A-10." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 76, no. 4, 2005, pp. 370-4.
Sevilla NL, Gardner JW. G-induced loss of consciousness: case-control study of 78 G-Locs in the F-15, F-16, and A-10. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005;76(4):370-4.
Sevilla, N. L., & Gardner, J. W. (2005). G-induced loss of consciousness: case-control study of 78 G-Locs in the F-15, F-16, and A-10. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 76(4), 370-4.
Sevilla NL, Gardner JW. G-induced Loss of Consciousness: Case-control Study of 78 G-Locs in the F-15, F-16, and A-10. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005;76(4):370-4. PubMed PMID: 15828637.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - G-induced loss of consciousness: case-control study of 78 G-Locs in the F-15, F-16, and A-10. AU - Sevilla,Nereyda L, AU - Gardner,John W, PY - 2005/4/15/pubmed PY - 2005/7/16/medline PY - 2005/4/15/entrez SP - 370 EP - 4 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 76 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: This study determined the trends of reported G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) mishaps from 1980--1999, and determined potential risk factors in pilot characteristics; specifically, 30/60/ 90-h and sortie history, total flight hours, total hours in the aircraft, age, height, weight, and BMI. METHODS: Using aircraft malfunction mishaps to reflect a cross-section of USAF pilots, potential risk factors were determined using a case-control method; cases were all G-LOC mishaps and controls were aircraft malfunction mishaps. The data consisted of 2002 mishap pilots in the history of the F-16, F-15, F-15E, and A-10 from 1980-1999. RESULTS: During this time, G-LOCs represented only 2.5% of all mishaps. The mean engagement number for G-LOC mishaps was three at an average of 8 Gs. A poor anti-G straining maneuver was cited in 72% of the mishaps, fatigue and G-suit malfunction in 19%, low G-tolerance at 14%, and 37% were student pilots. Within pilot characteristics, only two factors were found to be statistically significant: the time in the aircraft and pilot age. In the F-16, there was a 3.5 times greater chance of experiencing a G-LOC mishap if the pilot had less than 600 h in the aircraft [3.5 (1.7-7.2, 95%CI)], and a 9.5 times greater chance in the F-15 [9.5 (2.2-41.9, 95%CI)]. There was a 4.5 times greater chance of experiencing a G-LOC mishap if under the age of 30 in the F-16 [4.5 (2.3-8.5, 95% CI)] and a 3 times greater chance in the F-15 [2.8 (1.2-6.8, 95% CI)]. DISCUSSION: Though it is difficult to predict who will experience G-LOC, emphasis on prevention must be concentrated in training and in pilots new to the aircraft. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15828637/G_induced_loss_of_consciousness:_case_control_study_of_78_G_Locs_in_the_F_15_F_16_and_A_10_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0095-6562&volume=76&issue=4&spage=370&aulast=Sevilla DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -