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Factors associated with drug-induced visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease.
J Neurol. 2005 Oct; 252(10):1223-8.JN

Abstract

AIMS

Visual hallucinations are common in medication-treated Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Although their etiology is unknown several factors seem to be involved in their pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to identify possible risk factors and determine clinical characteristics associated with the development of visual hallucinations in PD.

METHODS

166 consecutive patients fulfilling clinical criteria for PD were studied. During a semi-structured interview, demographic characteristics and clinical variables were recorded. Motor, cognitive and psychiatric status was also assessed. Patients with and without visual hallucinations were compared using non-parametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data.

RESULTS

During the month before evaluation 20.4% of our patients experienced visual hallucinations (11.4% benign, 9% malignant). Logistic regression analysis identified three factors independently associated with visual hallucinations: long duration of Parkinson's disease, dementia, and disease severity as measured by the UPDRS total score.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings indicate that apart from well established risk factors such as cognitive impairment and disease duration, disease severity is also important for the development of visual hallucinations in PD. Furthermore, the presence of bradykinesia and instability, the absence of tremor and the severity of rigidity and bradykinesia (limb and axial) may act as cofactors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Neurology, University of Miami, School of Medicine, Room 4004, 1501 NW 9th Avenue, Miami, FL 33136, USA. spapapetropoulos@med.miami.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15834642

Citation

Papapetropoulos, Spiridon, et al. "Factors Associated With Drug-induced Visual Hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease." Journal of Neurology, vol. 252, no. 10, 2005, pp. 1223-8.
Papapetropoulos S, Argyriou AA, Ellul J. Factors associated with drug-induced visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. J Neurol. 2005;252(10):1223-8.
Papapetropoulos, S., Argyriou, A. A., & Ellul, J. (2005). Factors associated with drug-induced visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. Journal of Neurology, 252(10), 1223-8.
Papapetropoulos S, Argyriou AA, Ellul J. Factors Associated With Drug-induced Visual Hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease. J Neurol. 2005;252(10):1223-8. PubMed PMID: 15834642.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors associated with drug-induced visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. AU - Papapetropoulos,Spiridon, AU - Argyriou,Andreas A, AU - Ellul,John, Y1 - 2005/04/18/ PY - 2004/08/04/received PY - 2005/02/08/accepted PY - 2005/02/02/revised PY - 2005/4/19/pubmed PY - 2006/2/7/medline PY - 2005/4/19/entrez SP - 1223 EP - 8 JF - Journal of neurology JO - J Neurol VL - 252 IS - 10 N2 - AIMS: Visual hallucinations are common in medication-treated Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Although their etiology is unknown several factors seem to be involved in their pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to identify possible risk factors and determine clinical characteristics associated with the development of visual hallucinations in PD. METHODS: 166 consecutive patients fulfilling clinical criteria for PD were studied. During a semi-structured interview, demographic characteristics and clinical variables were recorded. Motor, cognitive and psychiatric status was also assessed. Patients with and without visual hallucinations were compared using non-parametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. RESULTS: During the month before evaluation 20.4% of our patients experienced visual hallucinations (11.4% benign, 9% malignant). Logistic regression analysis identified three factors independently associated with visual hallucinations: long duration of Parkinson's disease, dementia, and disease severity as measured by the UPDRS total score. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that apart from well established risk factors such as cognitive impairment and disease duration, disease severity is also important for the development of visual hallucinations in PD. Furthermore, the presence of bradykinesia and instability, the absence of tremor and the severity of rigidity and bradykinesia (limb and axial) may act as cofactors. SN - 0340-5354 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15834642/Factors_associated_with_drug_induced_visual_hallucinations_in_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-005-0840-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -