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Oesophagostomum bifurcum-induced nodular pathology in a highly endemic area of Northern Ghana.
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 2005; 99(6):417-22TR

Abstract

Human infection with Oesophagostomum bifurcum is rare globally, but focally endemic and common in Ghana and Togo. Two clinical presentations are identified: uni-nodular disease, which may be recognized as a 'Dapaong Tumour', and multi-nodular disease. Here, we describe the prevalence of O. bifurcum infection and the association with nodular pathology in northern Ghana. The study was performed in October 2002. Out of a well-defined population of approximately 18000, 928 subjects of all ages were randomly selected for parasitological and ultrasound examination. In stool cultures, 44% had detectable third-stage O. bifurcum larvae present. Females were more often infected than males (P<0.05). In 34% of the samples, nodules were detected along the colon wall, with the ascending and the transverse colon being the most affected regions. Significant correlations existed between the intensity of infection and the presence of nodules, both at the village and the individual level (P<0.001 for both). Patients with multi-nodular pathology had significantly higher larval counts than patients with uni-nodular pathology. The present data suggest that nodular pathology, and probably the severity of the disease, are directly related to intensity of the infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Parasitology, Leiden University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15837353

Citation

Ziem, J B., et al. "Oesophagostomum Bifurcum-induced Nodular Pathology in a Highly Endemic Area of Northern Ghana." Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 99, no. 6, 2005, pp. 417-22.
Ziem JB, Spannbrucker N, Magnussen P, et al. Oesophagostomum bifurcum-induced nodular pathology in a highly endemic area of Northern Ghana. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2005;99(6):417-22.
Ziem, J. B., Spannbrucker, N., Magnussen, P., Olsen, A., Amon-Kotey, D. N., Frenzel, K., ... Polderman, A. M. (2005). Oesophagostomum bifurcum-induced nodular pathology in a highly endemic area of Northern Ghana. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 99(6), pp. 417-22.
Ziem JB, et al. Oesophagostomum Bifurcum-induced Nodular Pathology in a Highly Endemic Area of Northern Ghana. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2005;99(6):417-22. PubMed PMID: 15837353.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oesophagostomum bifurcum-induced nodular pathology in a highly endemic area of Northern Ghana. AU - Ziem,J B, AU - Spannbrucker,N, AU - Magnussen,P, AU - Olsen,A, AU - Amon-Kotey,D Nii, AU - Frenzel,K, AU - Nang-Beifubah,A, AU - Westendorp,R G J, AU - Polderman,A M, PY - 2004/02/26/received PY - 2004/07/07/revised PY - 2004/07/22/accepted PY - 2005/4/20/pubmed PY - 2005/7/22/medline PY - 2005/4/20/entrez SP - 417 EP - 22 JF - Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene JO - Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 99 IS - 6 N2 - Human infection with Oesophagostomum bifurcum is rare globally, but focally endemic and common in Ghana and Togo. Two clinical presentations are identified: uni-nodular disease, which may be recognized as a 'Dapaong Tumour', and multi-nodular disease. Here, we describe the prevalence of O. bifurcum infection and the association with nodular pathology in northern Ghana. The study was performed in October 2002. Out of a well-defined population of approximately 18000, 928 subjects of all ages were randomly selected for parasitological and ultrasound examination. In stool cultures, 44% had detectable third-stage O. bifurcum larvae present. Females were more often infected than males (P<0.05). In 34% of the samples, nodules were detected along the colon wall, with the ascending and the transverse colon being the most affected regions. Significant correlations existed between the intensity of infection and the presence of nodules, both at the village and the individual level (P<0.001 for both). Patients with multi-nodular pathology had significantly higher larval counts than patients with uni-nodular pathology. The present data suggest that nodular pathology, and probably the severity of the disease, are directly related to intensity of the infection. SN - 0035-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15837353/Oesophagostomum_bifurcum-induced_nodular_pathology_in_a_highly_endemic_area_of_Northern_Ghana L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0035-9203(04)00306-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -