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Risperidone versus olanzapine for schizophrenia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Antipsychotic medication is a mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and risperidone and olanzapine are the most popular treatment choice of the new generation drugs.

OBJECTIVES

To determine the clinical effects, safety and cost effectiveness of risperidone compared with olanzapine for treating schizophrenia.

SEARCH STRATEGY

We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (June 2004) which is based on regular searches of, amongst others, BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. References of all identified studies were inspected for further trials. We also contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies for additional information.

SELECTION CRITERIA

We included all clinical randomised trials comparing risperidone with olanzapine for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS

We extracted data independently. For homogenous dichotomous data we calculated random effects, relative risk (RR), 95% confidence intervals (CI) and, where appropriate, numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/H) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD).

MAIN RESULTS

We found no difference for the outcome of unchanged or worse in the short term (n=548, 2 RCTs, RR 1.00 CI 0.88 to 1.15). One study, sponsored by the manufactures of olanzapine, favoured this drug for the outcome of relapse/rehospitalisation by 12 months (n=279, RR 2.16 CI 1.31 to 3.54, NNT 7 CI 4 to 25). Most mental state data showed the two drugs to as effective as each other (n=552, 2 RCTs, RR 'no <20% decrease PANSS by eight weeks' 1.01 CI 0.87 to 1.16). At least two thirds of people given risperidone or olanzapine experienced an adverse event (n=300, 2 RCTs, RR 1.16 CI 0.70 to 1.94). About 20% had anticholinergic symptoms (n=719, 3 RCTs, RR 1.12 CI 0.77 to 1.63) and 20% of both groups experienced insomnia (n=594, 3 RCTs, RR 1.33 CI 0.95 to 1.85) and approximately 33% sleepiness (n=719, 4 RCTs, 0.99 CI 0.79 to 1.23). One third of people given either drug experienced some extrapyramidal symptoms (n=893, 3 RCTs, RR 1.18 CI 0.75 to 1.88) but 25% of people using risperidone require medication to alleviate extrapyramidal adverse effects (n=419, 2 RCTs, RR 1.76 CI 1.25 to 2.48, NNH 8 CI 4 to 25). People allocated to risperidone were less likely to gain weight compared with those given olanzapine and the weight gain resulting from olanzapine can be considerable and of rapid onset (n=377, 1 RCT, RR gain more than 7% of their baseline weight 0.40 CI 0.23 to 0.70, NNT 8 CI 6 to 17). Risperidone may cause more sexual dysfunction than olanzapine (n=370, 2 RCTs, RR abnormal ejaculation 4.36 CI 1.38 to 13.76, NNH 20 CI 6 to 176; n=31, 1 RCT, RR impotence 2.43 CI 0.24 to 24.07). Within trials both drugs are associated with equal attrition (n=1217, 7 RCTs, RR leaving the study early 1.17 CI 0.92 to 1.49).

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS

Data regarding quality of life and economic outcomes are difficult to interpret, and for both these highly marketed new drugs we know very little from evaluative studies regarding service outcomes, general functioning and behaviour, engagement with services and treatment satisfaction. There is little to differentiate between risperidone and olanzapine except on the issue of adverse effects and both these drugs have unpleasant adverse effects. Risperidone is particularly associated with movement disorders and sexual dysfunction. Olanzapine can cause considerable rapid weight gain.This review highlights the need for large, independent, well designed, conducted and reported pragmatic randomised studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Becklin Centre, St James University Hospital, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK, LS9 3BE. maheshbj@hotmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15846745

Citation

Jayaram, M B., and P Hosalli. "Risperidone Versus Olanzapine for Schizophrenia." The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2005, p. CD005237.
Jayaram MB, Hosalli P. Risperidone versus olanzapine for schizophrenia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005.
Jayaram, M. B., & Hosalli, P. (2005). Risperidone versus olanzapine for schizophrenia. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2), CD005237.
Jayaram MB, Hosalli P. Risperidone Versus Olanzapine for Schizophrenia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005 Apr 18;(2)CD005237. PubMed PMID: 15846745.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risperidone versus olanzapine for schizophrenia. AU - Jayaram,M B, AU - Hosalli,P, Y1 - 2005/04/18/ PY - 2005/4/23/pubmed PY - 2005/7/20/medline PY - 2005/4/23/entrez SP - CD005237 EP - CD005237 JF - The Cochrane database of systematic reviews JO - Cochrane Database Syst Rev IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Antipsychotic medication is a mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and risperidone and olanzapine are the most popular treatment choice of the new generation drugs. OBJECTIVES: To determine the clinical effects, safety and cost effectiveness of risperidone compared with olanzapine for treating schizophrenia. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (June 2004) which is based on regular searches of, amongst others, BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. References of all identified studies were inspected for further trials. We also contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies for additional information. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all clinical randomised trials comparing risperidone with olanzapine for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We extracted data independently. For homogenous dichotomous data we calculated random effects, relative risk (RR), 95% confidence intervals (CI) and, where appropriate, numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/H) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD). MAIN RESULTS: We found no difference for the outcome of unchanged or worse in the short term (n=548, 2 RCTs, RR 1.00 CI 0.88 to 1.15). One study, sponsored by the manufactures of olanzapine, favoured this drug for the outcome of relapse/rehospitalisation by 12 months (n=279, RR 2.16 CI 1.31 to 3.54, NNT 7 CI 4 to 25). Most mental state data showed the two drugs to as effective as each other (n=552, 2 RCTs, RR 'no <20% decrease PANSS by eight weeks' 1.01 CI 0.87 to 1.16). At least two thirds of people given risperidone or olanzapine experienced an adverse event (n=300, 2 RCTs, RR 1.16 CI 0.70 to 1.94). About 20% had anticholinergic symptoms (n=719, 3 RCTs, RR 1.12 CI 0.77 to 1.63) and 20% of both groups experienced insomnia (n=594, 3 RCTs, RR 1.33 CI 0.95 to 1.85) and approximately 33% sleepiness (n=719, 4 RCTs, 0.99 CI 0.79 to 1.23). One third of people given either drug experienced some extrapyramidal symptoms (n=893, 3 RCTs, RR 1.18 CI 0.75 to 1.88) but 25% of people using risperidone require medication to alleviate extrapyramidal adverse effects (n=419, 2 RCTs, RR 1.76 CI 1.25 to 2.48, NNH 8 CI 4 to 25). People allocated to risperidone were less likely to gain weight compared with those given olanzapine and the weight gain resulting from olanzapine can be considerable and of rapid onset (n=377, 1 RCT, RR gain more than 7% of their baseline weight 0.40 CI 0.23 to 0.70, NNT 8 CI 6 to 17). Risperidone may cause more sexual dysfunction than olanzapine (n=370, 2 RCTs, RR abnormal ejaculation 4.36 CI 1.38 to 13.76, NNH 20 CI 6 to 176; n=31, 1 RCT, RR impotence 2.43 CI 0.24 to 24.07). Within trials both drugs are associated with equal attrition (n=1217, 7 RCTs, RR leaving the study early 1.17 CI 0.92 to 1.49). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Data regarding quality of life and economic outcomes are difficult to interpret, and for both these highly marketed new drugs we know very little from evaluative studies regarding service outcomes, general functioning and behaviour, engagement with services and treatment satisfaction. There is little to differentiate between risperidone and olanzapine except on the issue of adverse effects and both these drugs have unpleasant adverse effects. Risperidone is particularly associated with movement disorders and sexual dysfunction. Olanzapine can cause considerable rapid weight gain.This review highlights the need for large, independent, well designed, conducted and reported pragmatic randomised studies. SN - 1469-493X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15846745/Risperidone_versus_olanzapine_for_schizophrenia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD005237 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -