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HIV and intimate partner violence among methadone-maintained women in New York City.
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Jul; 61(1):171-83.SS

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been recognized as a risk factor for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among women, particularly among those who are drug involved. This study examines the temporal relationships between sexual and/or physical partner violence (IPV) and sexual risk of HIV/STI transmission in a longitudinal study with a random sample of 416 women enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment programs in New York City. Two hypotheses are tested: whether sexual risk-related factors or risk reduction behavior leads to subsequent IPV (H1); and whether IPV decreases likelihood of subsequent risk reduction behavior (i.e., requesting to use condoms) or increases likelihood of certain sexual risk-related factors (i.e., inconsistent condom use, having unprotected anal sex, having more than one partner, exchanging sex for drugs or money, having had an STI, being HIV positive, having a partner who engaged in HIV risk) (H2). Participants were interviewed at three waves: baseline, six months and twelve months. Hypotheses were examined using propensity score matching and multiple logistic regression analyses. The prevalence rate of any physical or sexual IPV was 46% at baseline. Findings for H1 indicate that women who reported always using condoms at wave 2 were significantly less likely than women who reported inconsistent or no condom use to experience subsequent IPV at wave 3. Similarly, increased risk of IPV at wave 3 was associated with self-reported STIs (OR=2.0, p=.03), and unprotected anal sex (OR= 2.0, p<.01); always requesting that partners use condoms was associated with a significant decrease in subsequent IPV (OR=.18, p<.01). Findings for H2 suggest that IPV at wave 2 decreased the subsequent likelihood of always using condoms at wave 3 (OR=.41, p<.01) and always requesting that a partner use condoms (OR=.42, p=.02). The implications of the findings for HIV prevention interventions for women on methadone are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Social Intervention Group, Columbia University School of Social Work, New York, NY 10027, USA. ne5@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15847970

Citation

El-Bassel, Nabila, et al. "HIV and Intimate Partner Violence Among Methadone-maintained Women in New York City." Social Science & Medicine (1982), vol. 61, no. 1, 2005, pp. 171-83.
El-Bassel N, Gilbert L, Wu E, et al. HIV and intimate partner violence among methadone-maintained women in New York City. Soc Sci Med. 2005;61(1):171-83.
El-Bassel, N., Gilbert, L., Wu, E., Go, H., & Hill, J. (2005). HIV and intimate partner violence among methadone-maintained women in New York City. Social Science & Medicine (1982), 61(1), 171-83.
El-Bassel N, et al. HIV and Intimate Partner Violence Among Methadone-maintained Women in New York City. Soc Sci Med. 2005;61(1):171-83. PubMed PMID: 15847970.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HIV and intimate partner violence among methadone-maintained women in New York City. AU - El-Bassel,Nabila, AU - Gilbert,Louisa, AU - Wu,Elwin, AU - Go,Hyun, AU - Hill,Jennifer, Y1 - 2005/01/28/ PY - 2003/06/11/received PY - 2004/11/11/accepted PY - 2005/4/26/pubmed PY - 2005/7/22/medline PY - 2005/4/26/entrez SP - 171 EP - 83 JF - Social science & medicine (1982) JO - Soc Sci Med VL - 61 IS - 1 N2 - Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been recognized as a risk factor for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among women, particularly among those who are drug involved. This study examines the temporal relationships between sexual and/or physical partner violence (IPV) and sexual risk of HIV/STI transmission in a longitudinal study with a random sample of 416 women enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment programs in New York City. Two hypotheses are tested: whether sexual risk-related factors or risk reduction behavior leads to subsequent IPV (H1); and whether IPV decreases likelihood of subsequent risk reduction behavior (i.e., requesting to use condoms) or increases likelihood of certain sexual risk-related factors (i.e., inconsistent condom use, having unprotected anal sex, having more than one partner, exchanging sex for drugs or money, having had an STI, being HIV positive, having a partner who engaged in HIV risk) (H2). Participants were interviewed at three waves: baseline, six months and twelve months. Hypotheses were examined using propensity score matching and multiple logistic regression analyses. The prevalence rate of any physical or sexual IPV was 46% at baseline. Findings for H1 indicate that women who reported always using condoms at wave 2 were significantly less likely than women who reported inconsistent or no condom use to experience subsequent IPV at wave 3. Similarly, increased risk of IPV at wave 3 was associated with self-reported STIs (OR=2.0, p=.03), and unprotected anal sex (OR= 2.0, p<.01); always requesting that partners use condoms was associated with a significant decrease in subsequent IPV (OR=.18, p<.01). Findings for H2 suggest that IPV at wave 2 decreased the subsequent likelihood of always using condoms at wave 3 (OR=.41, p<.01) and always requesting that a partner use condoms (OR=.42, p=.02). The implications of the findings for HIV prevention interventions for women on methadone are discussed. SN - 0277-9536 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15847970/HIV_and_intimate_partner_violence_among_methadone_maintained_women_in_New_York_City_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0277-9536(04)00593-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -