Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Afghan refugees in Iran model renal transplantation program: ethical considerations.
Transplant Proc. 2005 Mar; 37(2):565-7.TP

Abstract

During 23 years of civil war in Afghanistan, there has been a continuous flow of more than 5 million refugees out of the country. Iran has hosted about 40% of all refugees. The majority have resided outside of camps with opportunities to integrate locally, having access to the Iranian labor market and government services, such as dialysis and transplantation. Iran also has adopted a compensated living unrelated donor renal transplantation program in which foreigners can receive transplants from living related donors or volunteer living unrelated donors of the same nationality. In June 2004, among 241 refugees with end-stage kidney disease in Iran, 179 were on hemodialysis and 62 underwent renal transplantation. Nine patients received kidneys from living related donors, 1 from a spouse, 50 from Afghani living unrelated donors, and 1 from a cadaveric donor. No refugee had been used as a kidney donor to an Iranian patient. Transplantation of all Afghan refugees in need and the absence of their use as kidney donors to Iranian patients proffer strong evidence against commercialism and a reason to believe that the Iran Model transplantation is practiced with ethical standards. In the last 2 years since the civil war has ended, returning these patients to Afghanistan has raised important ethical concerns. Repatriation of dialysis patients and transplant recipients may be tantamount to their deaths. It is expected that The Transplantation Society and the World Health Organization will establish links with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugee Offices to provide humanitarian assistance to these patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Transplantation Unit, Hashemi Nejad Kidney Hospital, Tehran, Iran. ghods@iums.ac.irNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15848458

Citation

Ghods, A J., et al. "Afghan Refugees in Iran Model Renal Transplantation Program: Ethical Considerations." Transplantation Proceedings, vol. 37, no. 2, 2005, pp. 565-7.
Ghods AJ, Nasrollahzadeh D, Kazemeini M. Afghan refugees in Iran model renal transplantation program: ethical considerations. Transplant Proc. 2005;37(2):565-7.
Ghods, A. J., Nasrollahzadeh, D., & Kazemeini, M. (2005). Afghan refugees in Iran model renal transplantation program: ethical considerations. Transplantation Proceedings, 37(2), 565-7.
Ghods AJ, Nasrollahzadeh D, Kazemeini M. Afghan Refugees in Iran Model Renal Transplantation Program: Ethical Considerations. Transplant Proc. 2005;37(2):565-7. PubMed PMID: 15848458.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Afghan refugees in Iran model renal transplantation program: ethical considerations. AU - Ghods,A J, AU - Nasrollahzadeh,D, AU - Kazemeini,M, PY - 2005/4/26/pubmed PY - 2005/9/27/medline PY - 2005/4/26/entrez SP - 565 EP - 7 JF - Transplantation proceedings JO - Transplant Proc VL - 37 IS - 2 N2 - During 23 years of civil war in Afghanistan, there has been a continuous flow of more than 5 million refugees out of the country. Iran has hosted about 40% of all refugees. The majority have resided outside of camps with opportunities to integrate locally, having access to the Iranian labor market and government services, such as dialysis and transplantation. Iran also has adopted a compensated living unrelated donor renal transplantation program in which foreigners can receive transplants from living related donors or volunteer living unrelated donors of the same nationality. In June 2004, among 241 refugees with end-stage kidney disease in Iran, 179 were on hemodialysis and 62 underwent renal transplantation. Nine patients received kidneys from living related donors, 1 from a spouse, 50 from Afghani living unrelated donors, and 1 from a cadaveric donor. No refugee had been used as a kidney donor to an Iranian patient. Transplantation of all Afghan refugees in need and the absence of their use as kidney donors to Iranian patients proffer strong evidence against commercialism and a reason to believe that the Iran Model transplantation is practiced with ethical standards. In the last 2 years since the civil war has ended, returning these patients to Afghanistan has raised important ethical concerns. Repatriation of dialysis patients and transplant recipients may be tantamount to their deaths. It is expected that The Transplantation Society and the World Health Organization will establish links with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugee Offices to provide humanitarian assistance to these patients. SN - 0041-1345 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15848458/Afghan_refugees_in_Iran_model_renal_transplantation_program:_ethical_considerations_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0041-1345(04)01395-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -