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Impact of a food-based approach to improve iron nutrition of at-risk infants in northern Canada.
Prev Med. 2005 Jun; 40(6):896-903.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We evaluated the impact of a food-based approach in promoting iron-rich complementary feeding for mothers with infants at-risk for iron deficiency anemia (IDA).

METHODS

A repeat cross-sectional design was used to assess the impact of communication strategies to disseminate key messages promoting iron-rich complementary food. Two groups of mothers with infants, aged 7-10 months, at Time 1 (n = 32; response rate = 64%) and Time 2 (n = 22; response rate = 48%) were interviewed. Main outcome variables were infants' total iron and complementary food iron intakes measured by two 24-h recalls.

RESULTS

Complementary food iron intake increased between Time 1 (3.2 +/- 0.8 mg) and Time 2 (4.4 +/- 1.1 mg) (P < 0.05). The estimated prevalence of inadequacy was 56% (95% CI = 38%, 74%) for infants at Time 1 and 41% (95% CI = 20%, 62%) for infants at Time 2; however, this difference was not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS

A food-based approach, promoted in a community with infants at-risk for IDA, can positively contribute to improved intake of complementary food iron as well as provide a sustainable and relevant prevention strategy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21, 111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec H9X 3V9, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15850893

Citation

Verrall, Tanya, and Katherine Gray-Donald. "Impact of a Food-based Approach to Improve Iron Nutrition of At-risk Infants in Northern Canada." Preventive Medicine, vol. 40, no. 6, 2005, pp. 896-903.
Verrall T, Gray-Donald K. Impact of a food-based approach to improve iron nutrition of at-risk infants in northern Canada. Prev Med. 2005;40(6):896-903.
Verrall, T., & Gray-Donald, K. (2005). Impact of a food-based approach to improve iron nutrition of at-risk infants in northern Canada. Preventive Medicine, 40(6), 896-903.
Verrall T, Gray-Donald K. Impact of a Food-based Approach to Improve Iron Nutrition of At-risk Infants in Northern Canada. Prev Med. 2005;40(6):896-903. PubMed PMID: 15850893.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of a food-based approach to improve iron nutrition of at-risk infants in northern Canada. AU - Verrall,Tanya, AU - Gray-Donald,Katherine, PY - 2005/4/27/pubmed PY - 2005/9/7/medline PY - 2005/4/27/entrez SP - 896 EP - 903 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 40 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: We evaluated the impact of a food-based approach in promoting iron-rich complementary feeding for mothers with infants at-risk for iron deficiency anemia (IDA). METHODS: A repeat cross-sectional design was used to assess the impact of communication strategies to disseminate key messages promoting iron-rich complementary food. Two groups of mothers with infants, aged 7-10 months, at Time 1 (n = 32; response rate = 64%) and Time 2 (n = 22; response rate = 48%) were interviewed. Main outcome variables were infants' total iron and complementary food iron intakes measured by two 24-h recalls. RESULTS: Complementary food iron intake increased between Time 1 (3.2 +/- 0.8 mg) and Time 2 (4.4 +/- 1.1 mg) (P < 0.05). The estimated prevalence of inadequacy was 56% (95% CI = 38%, 74%) for infants at Time 1 and 41% (95% CI = 20%, 62%) for infants at Time 2; however, this difference was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: A food-based approach, promoted in a community with infants at-risk for IDA, can positively contribute to improved intake of complementary food iron as well as provide a sustainable and relevant prevention strategy. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15850893/Impact_of_a_food_based_approach_to_improve_iron_nutrition_of_at_risk_infants_in_northern_Canada_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(04)00535-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -