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[The antiemetic effect of dexamethasone during continuous subcutaneous infusion of morphine for postoperative pain relief].
Masui. 2005 Apr; 54(4):381-6.M

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dexamethasone is known to reduce the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, associated with perioperative intrathecal, epidural, or intravenous morphine. However, the effect of dexamethasone on subcutaneous morphine is unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the antiemetic effect of intravenous dexamethasone during continuous subcutaneous infusion of morphine for postoperative pain relief.

METHODS

Twenty patients scheduled for spinal surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study. The dexamethasone group (n=10) received dexamethasone 8 mg and the saline group (n=10) received the same amount of saline before the induction of anesthesia. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol and fentanyl. Postoperative pain was treated with continuous subcutaneous morphine via a patient-controlled analgesia device. Postoperatively patients were assessed during 48 hours for nausea and vomiting.

RESULTS

Nausea or vomiting ascribable to the subcutaneous morphine developed in 40% of the patients in each group (P:NS).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that the single dose of dexamethasone (8 mg) does not reduce postoperative nausea and vomiting associated with continuous subcutaneous infusion of morphine after spinal surgery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anesthesiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
English Abstract
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

15852624

Citation

Seki, Hiroyuki, et al. "[The Antiemetic Effect of Dexamethasone During Continuous Subcutaneous Infusion of Morphine for Postoperative Pain Relief]." Masui. the Japanese Journal of Anesthesiology, vol. 54, no. 4, 2005, pp. 381-6.
Seki H, Kashiwagi M, Masuda J, et al. [The antiemetic effect of dexamethasone during continuous subcutaneous infusion of morphine for postoperative pain relief]. Masui. 2005;54(4):381-6.
Seki, H., Kashiwagi, M., Masuda, J., Ohyama, N., & Kamata, M. (2005). [The antiemetic effect of dexamethasone during continuous subcutaneous infusion of morphine for postoperative pain relief]. Masui. the Japanese Journal of Anesthesiology, 54(4), 381-6.
Seki H, et al. [The Antiemetic Effect of Dexamethasone During Continuous Subcutaneous Infusion of Morphine for Postoperative Pain Relief]. Masui. 2005;54(4):381-6. PubMed PMID: 15852624.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [The antiemetic effect of dexamethasone during continuous subcutaneous infusion of morphine for postoperative pain relief]. AU - Seki,Hiroyuki, AU - Kashiwagi,Masanori, AU - Masuda,Junichi, AU - Ohyama,Nami, AU - Kamata,Michihiro, PY - 2005/4/28/pubmed PY - 2005/6/4/medline PY - 2005/4/28/entrez SP - 381 EP - 6 JF - Masui. The Japanese journal of anesthesiology JO - Masui VL - 54 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dexamethasone is known to reduce the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, associated with perioperative intrathecal, epidural, or intravenous morphine. However, the effect of dexamethasone on subcutaneous morphine is unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the antiemetic effect of intravenous dexamethasone during continuous subcutaneous infusion of morphine for postoperative pain relief. METHODS: Twenty patients scheduled for spinal surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study. The dexamethasone group (n=10) received dexamethasone 8 mg and the saline group (n=10) received the same amount of saline before the induction of anesthesia. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol and fentanyl. Postoperative pain was treated with continuous subcutaneous morphine via a patient-controlled analgesia device. Postoperatively patients were assessed during 48 hours for nausea and vomiting. RESULTS: Nausea or vomiting ascribable to the subcutaneous morphine developed in 40% of the patients in each group (P:NS). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the single dose of dexamethasone (8 mg) does not reduce postoperative nausea and vomiting associated with continuous subcutaneous infusion of morphine after spinal surgery. SN - 0021-4892 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15852624/[The_antiemetic_effect_of_dexamethasone_during_continuous_subcutaneous_infusion_of_morphine_for_postoperative_pain_relief]_ L2 - https://antibodies.cancer.gov/detail/CPTC-KRAS4B-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -