Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Physicochemical action of potassium-magnesium citrate in nephrolithiasis.
J Bone Miner Res. 1992 Mar; 7(3):281-5.JB

Abstract

Effect of potassium-magnesium citrate on urinary biochemistry and crystallization of stone-forming salts was compared with that of potassium citrate at same dose of potassium in five normal subjects and five patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Compared to the placebo phase, urinary pH rose significantly from 6.06 +/- 0.27 to 6.48 +/- 0.36 (mean +/- SD, p less than 0.0167) during treatment with potassium citrate (50 mEq/day for 7 days) and to 6.68 +/- 0.31 during therapy with potassium-magnesium citrate (containing 49 mEq K, 24.5 mEq Mg, and 73.5 mEq citrate per day). Urinary pH was significantly higher during potassium-magnesium citrate than during potassium citrate therapy. Thus, the amount of undissociated uric acid declined from 118 +/- 61 mg/day during the placebo phase to 68 +/- 54 mg/day during potassium citrate treatment and, more prominently, to 41 +/- 46 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy. Urinary magnesium rose significantly from 102 +/- 25 to 146 +/- 37 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy but not during potassium citrate therapy. Urinary citrate rose more prominently during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy (to 1027 +/- 478 mg/day from 638 +/- 252 mg/day) than during potassium citrate treatment (to 932 +/- 297 mg/day). Consequently, urinary saturation (activity product) of calcium oxalate declined significantly (from 1.49 x 10(-8) to 1.03 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy and marginally (to 1.14 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium citrate therapy.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1585829

Citation

Pak, C Y., et al. "Physicochemical Action of Potassium-magnesium Citrate in Nephrolithiasis." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 7, no. 3, 1992, pp. 281-5.
Pak CY, Koenig K, Khan R, et al. Physicochemical action of potassium-magnesium citrate in nephrolithiasis. J Bone Miner Res. 1992;7(3):281-5.
Pak, C. Y., Koenig, K., Khan, R., Haynes, S., & Padalino, P. (1992). Physicochemical action of potassium-magnesium citrate in nephrolithiasis. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 7(3), 281-5.
Pak CY, et al. Physicochemical Action of Potassium-magnesium Citrate in Nephrolithiasis. J Bone Miner Res. 1992;7(3):281-5. PubMed PMID: 1585829.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physicochemical action of potassium-magnesium citrate in nephrolithiasis. AU - Pak,C Y, AU - Koenig,K, AU - Khan,R, AU - Haynes,S, AU - Padalino,P, PY - 1992/3/1/pubmed PY - 1992/3/1/medline PY - 1992/3/1/entrez KW - NASA Discipline Regulatory Physiology KW - Non-NASA Center SP - 281 EP - 5 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J Bone Miner Res VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - Effect of potassium-magnesium citrate on urinary biochemistry and crystallization of stone-forming salts was compared with that of potassium citrate at same dose of potassium in five normal subjects and five patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Compared to the placebo phase, urinary pH rose significantly from 6.06 +/- 0.27 to 6.48 +/- 0.36 (mean +/- SD, p less than 0.0167) during treatment with potassium citrate (50 mEq/day for 7 days) and to 6.68 +/- 0.31 during therapy with potassium-magnesium citrate (containing 49 mEq K, 24.5 mEq Mg, and 73.5 mEq citrate per day). Urinary pH was significantly higher during potassium-magnesium citrate than during potassium citrate therapy. Thus, the amount of undissociated uric acid declined from 118 +/- 61 mg/day during the placebo phase to 68 +/- 54 mg/day during potassium citrate treatment and, more prominently, to 41 +/- 46 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy. Urinary magnesium rose significantly from 102 +/- 25 to 146 +/- 37 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy but not during potassium citrate therapy. Urinary citrate rose more prominently during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy (to 1027 +/- 478 mg/day from 638 +/- 252 mg/day) than during potassium citrate treatment (to 932 +/- 297 mg/day). Consequently, urinary saturation (activity product) of calcium oxalate declined significantly (from 1.49 x 10(-8) to 1.03 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy and marginally (to 1.14 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium citrate therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1585829/Physicochemical_action_of_potassium_magnesium_citrate_in_nephrolithiasis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.5650070306 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -