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Body mass index (BMI) in newly admitted child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Obesity is a major problem among children and adolescents suffering from chronic mental illness. State-of-the-art measures such as body mass index (BMI) and growth-related weight charts are now readily available to clinicians and investigators interested in psychotropic drug-associated weight gain in the pediatric population. However, no reports that utilize such measures in large series of children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders are available.

METHODS

The authors employed the Nutstat module of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Epi Info software to assess BMI in a psychiatry inpatient child and adolescent population in Central Virginia. The authors also developed a scoring system to relate psychotropic administration to BMI.

RESULTS

Children and adolescents with chronic mental illness had greater BMI measurements than the general pediatric population. Our scoring system found a relationship between antipsychotic drug administration and increased BMI that almost reached a level of significance (p=0.062).

CONCLUSIONS

The present methodology using absolute weight to assess psychotropic drug-associated increase in body weight for children and adolescents is unsatisfactory. The authors offer a new and convenient methodology to correct this problem.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. vvieweg@vcu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15866351

Citation

Vieweg, W Victor R., et al. "Body Mass Index (BMI) in Newly Admitted Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients." Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, vol. 29, no. 4, 2005, pp. 511-5.
Vieweg WV, Kuhnley LJ, Kuhnley EJ, et al. Body mass index (BMI) in newly admitted child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2005;29(4):511-5.
Vieweg, W. V., Kuhnley, L. J., Kuhnley, E. J., Anum, E. A., Sood, B., Pandurangi, A., & Silverman, J. J. (2005). Body mass index (BMI) in newly admitted child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 29(4), pp. 511-5.
Vieweg WV, et al. Body Mass Index (BMI) in Newly Admitted Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2005;29(4):511-5. PubMed PMID: 15866351.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index (BMI) in newly admitted child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients. AU - Vieweg,W Victor R, AU - Kuhnley,Lisa J, AU - Kuhnley,E John, AU - Anum,Emmanuel A, AU - Sood,Bela, AU - Pandurangi,Anand, AU - Silverman,Joel J, Y1 - 2005/03/21/ PY - 2005/01/28/accepted PY - 2005/5/4/pubmed PY - 2005/7/12/medline PY - 2005/5/4/entrez SP - 511 EP - 5 JF - Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry JO - Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry VL - 29 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Obesity is a major problem among children and adolescents suffering from chronic mental illness. State-of-the-art measures such as body mass index (BMI) and growth-related weight charts are now readily available to clinicians and investigators interested in psychotropic drug-associated weight gain in the pediatric population. However, no reports that utilize such measures in large series of children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders are available. METHODS: The authors employed the Nutstat module of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Epi Info software to assess BMI in a psychiatry inpatient child and adolescent population in Central Virginia. The authors also developed a scoring system to relate psychotropic administration to BMI. RESULTS: Children and adolescents with chronic mental illness had greater BMI measurements than the general pediatric population. Our scoring system found a relationship between antipsychotic drug administration and increased BMI that almost reached a level of significance (p=0.062). CONCLUSIONS: The present methodology using absolute weight to assess psychotropic drug-associated increase in body weight for children and adolescents is unsatisfactory. The authors offer a new and convenient methodology to correct this problem. SN - 0278-5846 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15866351/Body_mass_index__BMI__in_newly_admitted_child_and_adolescent_psychiatric_inpatients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-5846(05)00043-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -