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Contributions of depressive mood and circulating inflammatory markers to coronary heart disease in healthy European men: the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME).
Circulation 2005; 111(18):2299-305Circ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Data on the possible association between depressive disorders and inflammatory markers are scarce and inconsistent. We investigated whether subjects with depressive mood had higher levels of a wide range of inflammatory markers involved in coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence and examined the contribution of these inflammatory markers and depressive mood to CHD outcome.

METHODS AND RESULTS

We built a nested case-referent study within the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME) study of healthy middle-aged men from Belfast and France. We considered the baseline plasma sample from 335 future cases (angina pectoris, nonfatal myocardial infarction, coronary death) and 670 matched controls (2 controls per case). Depressive mood characterized men whose baseline depression score (13-item modification of the Welsh depression subscale) was in the fourth quartile (mean score, 5.75; range, 4 to 12). On average, men with depressive mood had 46%, 16%, and 10% higher C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels, respectively, independently of case-control status, social characteristics, and classic cardiovascular risk factors; no statistical difference was found for fibrinogen. The odds ratios of depressive mood for CHD were 1.35 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.73) in univariate analysis and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.04 to 2.15) after adjustment for social characteristics and classic cardiovascular risk factors. The latter odds ratio remained unchanged when each inflammatory marker was added separately, and in this analysis, each inflammatory marker contributed significantly to CHD event risk.

CONCLUSIONS

These data support an association of depressive mood with inflammatory markers and suggest that depressive mood is related to CHD even after adjustment for these inflammatory markers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

INSERM Avenir, Epidemiology of Sudden Death in the Population, Villejuif, France. empana@vjf.inserm.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15867179

Citation

Empana, J P., et al. "Contributions of Depressive Mood and Circulating Inflammatory Markers to Coronary Heart Disease in Healthy European Men: the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME)." Circulation, vol. 111, no. 18, 2005, pp. 2299-305.
Empana JP, Sykes DH, Luc G, et al. Contributions of depressive mood and circulating inflammatory markers to coronary heart disease in healthy European men: the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME). Circulation. 2005;111(18):2299-305.
Empana, J. P., Sykes, D. H., Luc, G., Juhan-Vague, I., Arveiler, D., Ferrieres, J., ... Ducimetiere, P. (2005). Contributions of depressive mood and circulating inflammatory markers to coronary heart disease in healthy European men: the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME). Circulation, 111(18), pp. 2299-305.
Empana JP, et al. Contributions of Depressive Mood and Circulating Inflammatory Markers to Coronary Heart Disease in Healthy European Men: the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME). Circulation. 2005 May 10;111(18):2299-305. PubMed PMID: 15867179.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contributions of depressive mood and circulating inflammatory markers to coronary heart disease in healthy European men: the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME). AU - Empana,J P, AU - Sykes,D H, AU - Luc,G, AU - Juhan-Vague,I, AU - Arveiler,D, AU - Ferrieres,J, AU - Amouyel,P, AU - Bingham,A, AU - Montaye,M, AU - Ruidavets,J B, AU - Haas,B, AU - Evans,A, AU - Jouven,X, AU - Ducimetiere,P, AU - ,, Y1 - 2005/05/02/ PY - 2005/5/4/pubmed PY - 2006/1/18/medline PY - 2005/5/4/entrez SP - 2299 EP - 305 JF - Circulation JO - Circulation VL - 111 IS - 18 N2 - BACKGROUND: Data on the possible association between depressive disorders and inflammatory markers are scarce and inconsistent. We investigated whether subjects with depressive mood had higher levels of a wide range of inflammatory markers involved in coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence and examined the contribution of these inflammatory markers and depressive mood to CHD outcome. METHODS AND RESULTS: We built a nested case-referent study within the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME) study of healthy middle-aged men from Belfast and France. We considered the baseline plasma sample from 335 future cases (angina pectoris, nonfatal myocardial infarction, coronary death) and 670 matched controls (2 controls per case). Depressive mood characterized men whose baseline depression score (13-item modification of the Welsh depression subscale) was in the fourth quartile (mean score, 5.75; range, 4 to 12). On average, men with depressive mood had 46%, 16%, and 10% higher C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels, respectively, independently of case-control status, social characteristics, and classic cardiovascular risk factors; no statistical difference was found for fibrinogen. The odds ratios of depressive mood for CHD were 1.35 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.73) in univariate analysis and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.04 to 2.15) after adjustment for social characteristics and classic cardiovascular risk factors. The latter odds ratio remained unchanged when each inflammatory marker was added separately, and in this analysis, each inflammatory marker contributed significantly to CHD event risk. CONCLUSIONS: These data support an association of depressive mood with inflammatory markers and suggest that depressive mood is related to CHD even after adjustment for these inflammatory markers. SN - 1524-4539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15867179/Contributions_of_depressive_mood_and_circulating_inflammatory_markers_to_coronary_heart_disease_in_healthy_European_men:_the_Prospective_Epidemiological_Study_of_Myocardial_Infarction__PRIME__ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/01.CIR.0000164203.54111.AE?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -