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Hangover frequency and risk for alcohol use disorders: evidence from a longitudinal high-risk study.
J Abnorm Psychol 2005; 114(2):223-34JA

Abstract

Data from a prospective high-risk study (N=489; 51% with a family history of alcoholism) were used to test whether family history is associated with greater hangover proneness and whether hangover is a risk factor for alcohol use disorders. Hangover was more frequent in family-history-positive participants during the college years. Persons with an alcohol diagnosis showed excess hangover before earning a diagnosis. Year 1 hangover predicted alcohol use disorders at Years 7 and 11, even when family history, sex, Year 1 diagnoses, and Year 1 drinking were statistically controlled. Several nonhangover drinking symptoms failed to predict later diagnoses. Taken together, the findings suggest a need for further research and theory on the role of hangover in the etiology of drinking problems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia and Midwest Alcholism Research Center, Columbia, MO 65211, US. piaseckit@missouri.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15869353

Citation

Piasecki, Thomas M., et al. "Hangover Frequency and Risk for Alcohol Use Disorders: Evidence From a Longitudinal High-risk Study." Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 114, no. 2, 2005, pp. 223-34.
Piasecki TM, Sher KJ, Slutske WS, et al. Hangover frequency and risk for alcohol use disorders: evidence from a longitudinal high-risk study. J Abnorm Psychol. 2005;114(2):223-34.
Piasecki, T. M., Sher, K. J., Slutske, W. S., & Jackson, K. M. (2005). Hangover frequency and risk for alcohol use disorders: evidence from a longitudinal high-risk study. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 114(2), pp. 223-34.
Piasecki TM, et al. Hangover Frequency and Risk for Alcohol Use Disorders: Evidence From a Longitudinal High-risk Study. J Abnorm Psychol. 2005;114(2):223-34. PubMed PMID: 15869353.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hangover frequency and risk for alcohol use disorders: evidence from a longitudinal high-risk study. AU - Piasecki,Thomas M, AU - Sher,Kenneth J, AU - Slutske,Wendy S, AU - Jackson,Kristina M, PY - 2005/5/5/pubmed PY - 2005/6/23/medline PY - 2005/5/5/entrez SP - 223 EP - 34 JF - Journal of abnormal psychology JO - J Abnorm Psychol VL - 114 IS - 2 N2 - Data from a prospective high-risk study (N=489; 51% with a family history of alcoholism) were used to test whether family history is associated with greater hangover proneness and whether hangover is a risk factor for alcohol use disorders. Hangover was more frequent in family-history-positive participants during the college years. Persons with an alcohol diagnosis showed excess hangover before earning a diagnosis. Year 1 hangover predicted alcohol use disorders at Years 7 and 11, even when family history, sex, Year 1 diagnoses, and Year 1 drinking were statistically controlled. Several nonhangover drinking symptoms failed to predict later diagnoses. Taken together, the findings suggest a need for further research and theory on the role of hangover in the etiology of drinking problems. SN - 0021-843X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15869353/Hangover_frequency_and_risk_for_alcohol_use_disorders:_evidence_from_a_longitudinal_high_risk_study_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/abn/114/2/223 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -