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Plasma homocysteine is related to folate intake but not training status.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2005 Apr; 15(2):125-33.NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Lifestyle including intakes of several essential nutrients and physical activity are of particular interest in reducing plasma total homocysteine concentration (tHcy), a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to determine in athletes, whether dietary factors such as intakes of folate, vitamin B6 and B12 were associated with lower plasma tHcy, and whether this depended on daily energy expenditure (EE) and type of physical activity performed (aerobic, anaerobic, intermittent).

METHODS

Seventy-four well-trained athletes completed 7-day food and activity records in a cross-sectional study. Blood was sampled on day 8.

RESULTS

Percentage of vegetal protein, vitamin B6, and folate intakes were higher and tHcy was lower (1) in athletes with high EE (> 16.72 MJ/d) compared to athletes with lower EE; (2) in aerobic athletes compared to intermittent athletes and sedentary subjects. After backward step by step analysis, folate intake was the only significant variable retained in the model to explain tHcy variability. Moreover, after introducing folate intake as a covariate in ANOVA tests, group effects on tHcy were no longer significant. Nutrient density of folate was inversely correlated to tHcy in athletes (r = -0.33; P = 0.004).

CONCLUSION

High energy intake (> 16.72 MJ/d) allows the necessary folate intake (> 500 microg/d) for tHcy decrease to occur, which is moreover favored by aerobic activity. The mechanism underlying low tHcy in relation to high EE could only play a minor role when compared to the effect of dietary folate intake on tHcy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratoire Nutrition, Vieillissement et Maladies Cardiovasculaires, UFR Pharmacie, UJF Grenoble, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15871861

Citation

Rousseau, A S., et al. "Plasma Homocysteine Is Related to Folate Intake but Not Training Status." Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, vol. 15, no. 2, 2005, pp. 125-33.
Rousseau AS, Robin S, Roussel AM, et al. Plasma homocysteine is related to folate intake but not training status. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2005;15(2):125-33.
Rousseau, A. S., Robin, S., Roussel, A. M., Ducros, V., & Margaritis, I. (2005). Plasma homocysteine is related to folate intake but not training status. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, 15(2), 125-33.
Rousseau AS, et al. Plasma Homocysteine Is Related to Folate Intake but Not Training Status. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2005;15(2):125-33. PubMed PMID: 15871861.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma homocysteine is related to folate intake but not training status. AU - Rousseau,A S, AU - Robin,S, AU - Roussel,A M, AU - Ducros,V, AU - Margaritis,I, Y1 - 2005/04/14/ PY - 2004/09/17/received PY - 2005/02/11/accepted PY - 2005/5/6/pubmed PY - 2005/9/24/medline PY - 2005/5/6/entrez SP - 125 EP - 33 JF - Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD JO - Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis VL - 15 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Lifestyle including intakes of several essential nutrients and physical activity are of particular interest in reducing plasma total homocysteine concentration (tHcy), a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to determine in athletes, whether dietary factors such as intakes of folate, vitamin B6 and B12 were associated with lower plasma tHcy, and whether this depended on daily energy expenditure (EE) and type of physical activity performed (aerobic, anaerobic, intermittent). METHODS: Seventy-four well-trained athletes completed 7-day food and activity records in a cross-sectional study. Blood was sampled on day 8. RESULTS: Percentage of vegetal protein, vitamin B6, and folate intakes were higher and tHcy was lower (1) in athletes with high EE (> 16.72 MJ/d) compared to athletes with lower EE; (2) in aerobic athletes compared to intermittent athletes and sedentary subjects. After backward step by step analysis, folate intake was the only significant variable retained in the model to explain tHcy variability. Moreover, after introducing folate intake as a covariate in ANOVA tests, group effects on tHcy were no longer significant. Nutrient density of folate was inversely correlated to tHcy in athletes (r = -0.33; P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: High energy intake (> 16.72 MJ/d) allows the necessary folate intake (> 500 microg/d) for tHcy decrease to occur, which is moreover favored by aerobic activity. The mechanism underlying low tHcy in relation to high EE could only play a minor role when compared to the effect of dietary folate intake on tHcy. SN - 0939-4753 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15871861/Plasma_homocysteine_is_related_to_folate_intake_but_not_training_status_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0939-4753(05)00029-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -