Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Circulating epstein-barr virus in children living in malaria-endemic areas.
Scand J Immunol. 2005 May; 61(5):461-5.SJ

Abstract

Children living in malaria-endemic regions have high incidence of Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), the aetiology of which involves Plasmodium falciparum malaria and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections. Acute malarial infection impairs the EBV-specific immune responses with the consequent increase in the number of EBV-carrying B cells in the circulation. To further understand the potential influence of malarial infection on the EBV persistence in children living in malaria-endemic areas, we studied the occurrence and quantified cell-free EBV-DNA in plasma from 73 Ghanaian children with and without acute malarial infection. Viral DNA was detected in 40% of the samples (47% in the malaria-infected and 34% in the nonmalaria group) but was absent in plasma from Ghanaian adults and healthy Italian children. These findings provide evidence that viral reactivation is common among children living in malaria-endemic areas, and may contribute to the increased risk for endemic BL. The data also suggest that the epidemiology of EBV infection and persistence varies in different areas of the world.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Microbiology and Tumor Biology Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15882438

Citation

Rasti, N, et al. "Circulating Epstein-barr Virus in Children Living in Malaria-endemic Areas." Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, vol. 61, no. 5, 2005, pp. 461-5.
Rasti N, Falk KI, Donati D, et al. Circulating epstein-barr virus in children living in malaria-endemic areas. Scand J Immunol. 2005;61(5):461-5.
Rasti, N., Falk, K. I., Donati, D., Gyan, B. A., Goka, B. Q., Troye-Blomberg, M., Akanmori, B. D., Kurtzhals, J. A., Dodoo, D., Consolini, R., Linde, A., Wahlgren, M., & Bejarano, M. T. (2005). Circulating epstein-barr virus in children living in malaria-endemic areas. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, 61(5), 461-5.
Rasti N, et al. Circulating Epstein-barr Virus in Children Living in Malaria-endemic Areas. Scand J Immunol. 2005;61(5):461-5. PubMed PMID: 15882438.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Circulating epstein-barr virus in children living in malaria-endemic areas. AU - Rasti,N, AU - Falk,K I, AU - Donati,D, AU - Gyan,B A, AU - Goka,B Q, AU - Troye-Blomberg,M, AU - Akanmori,B D, AU - Kurtzhals,J A L, AU - Dodoo,D, AU - Consolini,R, AU - Linde,A, AU - Wahlgren,M, AU - Bejarano,M T, PY - 2005/5/11/pubmed PY - 2005/6/7/medline PY - 2005/5/11/entrez SP - 461 EP - 5 JF - Scandinavian journal of immunology JO - Scand J Immunol VL - 61 IS - 5 N2 - Children living in malaria-endemic regions have high incidence of Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), the aetiology of which involves Plasmodium falciparum malaria and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections. Acute malarial infection impairs the EBV-specific immune responses with the consequent increase in the number of EBV-carrying B cells in the circulation. To further understand the potential influence of malarial infection on the EBV persistence in children living in malaria-endemic areas, we studied the occurrence and quantified cell-free EBV-DNA in plasma from 73 Ghanaian children with and without acute malarial infection. Viral DNA was detected in 40% of the samples (47% in the malaria-infected and 34% in the nonmalaria group) but was absent in plasma from Ghanaian adults and healthy Italian children. These findings provide evidence that viral reactivation is common among children living in malaria-endemic areas, and may contribute to the increased risk for endemic BL. The data also suggest that the epidemiology of EBV infection and persistence varies in different areas of the world. SN - 0300-9475 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15882438/Circulating_epstein_barr_virus_in_children_living_in_malaria_endemic_areas_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3083.2005.01589.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -