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Dairy consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men: a prospective study.
Arch Intern Med 2005; 165(9):997-1003AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diet and lifestyle modifications can substantially reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. While a strong inverse association has been reported between dairy consumption and the insulin resistance syndrome among young obese adults, the relation between dairy intake and type 2 diabetes is unknown.

METHODS

We prospectively examined the relation between dairy intake and incident cases of type 2 diabetes in 41,254 male participants with no history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study.

RESULTS

During 12 years of follow-up, we documented 1243 incident cases of type 2 diabetes. Dairy intake was associated with a modestly lower risk of type 2 diabetes. After adjusting for potential confounders, including body mass index, physical activity, and dietary factors, the relative risk for type 2 diabetes in men in the top quintile of dairy intake was 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-0.95; P for trend, .003) compared with those in the lowest quintile. Each serving-per-day increase in total dairy intake was associated with a 9% lower risk for type 2 diabetes (multivariate relative risk, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.97). The corresponding relative risk was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.81-0.94) for low-fat dairy intake and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.91-1.07) for high-fat dairy intake. The association did not vary significantly according to body mass index (< 25 vs > or = 25 kg/m(2); P for interaction, .57).

CONCLUSION

Dietary patterns characterized by higher dairy intake, especially low-fat dairy intake, may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass 02114, USA. hchoi@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15883237

Citation

Choi, Hyon K., et al. "Dairy Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Men: a Prospective Study." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 165, no. 9, 2005, pp. 997-1003.
Choi HK, Willett WC, Stampfer MJ, et al. Dairy consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men: a prospective study. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(9):997-1003.
Choi, H. K., Willett, W. C., Stampfer, M. J., Rimm, E., & Hu, F. B. (2005). Dairy consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men: a prospective study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165(9), pp. 997-1003.
Choi HK, et al. Dairy Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Men: a Prospective Study. Arch Intern Med. 2005 May 9;165(9):997-1003. PubMed PMID: 15883237.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men: a prospective study. AU - Choi,Hyon K, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Rimm,Eric, AU - Hu,Frank B, PY - 2005/5/11/pubmed PY - 2005/6/9/medline PY - 2005/5/11/entrez SP - 997 EP - 1003 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 165 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Diet and lifestyle modifications can substantially reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. While a strong inverse association has been reported between dairy consumption and the insulin resistance syndrome among young obese adults, the relation between dairy intake and type 2 diabetes is unknown. METHODS: We prospectively examined the relation between dairy intake and incident cases of type 2 diabetes in 41,254 male participants with no history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. RESULTS: During 12 years of follow-up, we documented 1243 incident cases of type 2 diabetes. Dairy intake was associated with a modestly lower risk of type 2 diabetes. After adjusting for potential confounders, including body mass index, physical activity, and dietary factors, the relative risk for type 2 diabetes in men in the top quintile of dairy intake was 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-0.95; P for trend, .003) compared with those in the lowest quintile. Each serving-per-day increase in total dairy intake was associated with a 9% lower risk for type 2 diabetes (multivariate relative risk, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.97). The corresponding relative risk was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.81-0.94) for low-fat dairy intake and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.91-1.07) for high-fat dairy intake. The association did not vary significantly according to body mass index (< 25 vs > or = 25 kg/m(2); P for interaction, .57). CONCLUSION: Dietary patterns characterized by higher dairy intake, especially low-fat dairy intake, may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in men. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15883237/Dairy_consumption_and_risk_of_type_2_diabetes_mellitus_in_men:_a_prospective_study_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.165.9.997 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -