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Reasons for intentional weight loss, unintentional weight loss, and mortality in older men.
Arch Intern Med 2005; 165(9):1035-40AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We have examined the relationship between intentional and unintentional weight loss and the reasons underlying intention to lose weight and all-cause mortality and mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and non-CVD causes in older men.

METHODS

Prospective study of 4869 men aged 56 to 75 years drawn from general practices in 24 British towns, who in 1996 completed questionnaires about intentional and unintentional weight loss over the preceding 4 years and were followed up for a subsequent 7 years.

RESULTS

Unintentional but not intentional weight loss was associated with a significant increase in risk of all-cause mortality compared with men who reported no weight change, even after adjustment for lifestyle characteristics and preexisting disease (adjusted relative risk [RR], 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-2.19; and RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.91-1.10, respectively). Men who lost weight intentionally as a result of personal choice showed significant benefit in all-cause mortality (RR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.34-1.00; P = .05), which was largely owing to a significant reduction in mortality from non-CVD causes (RR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15-0.87). The benefit in these men was most apparent in markedly overweight men (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters] > or = 28) and in younger men (age < 65 years). Men who lost weight intentionally owing to ill health or physician's advice showed an increased risk of all-cause mortality (RR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.96-1.94). No harm or benefit was seen for CVD mortality, irrespective of reasons for intentional weight loss.

CONCLUSION

Intentional weight loss carried out for personal reasons is associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in markedly overweight men, and the data suggest that the earlier the intervention, the greater the chance of benefit.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, England. goya@pcps.ucl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15883243

Citation

Wannamethee, S Goya, et al. "Reasons for Intentional Weight Loss, Unintentional Weight Loss, and Mortality in Older Men." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 165, no. 9, 2005, pp. 1035-40.
Wannamethee SG, Shaper AG, Lennon L. Reasons for intentional weight loss, unintentional weight loss, and mortality in older men. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(9):1035-40.
Wannamethee, S. G., Shaper, A. G., & Lennon, L. (2005). Reasons for intentional weight loss, unintentional weight loss, and mortality in older men. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165(9), pp. 1035-40.
Wannamethee SG, Shaper AG, Lennon L. Reasons for Intentional Weight Loss, Unintentional Weight Loss, and Mortality in Older Men. Arch Intern Med. 2005 May 9;165(9):1035-40. PubMed PMID: 15883243.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reasons for intentional weight loss, unintentional weight loss, and mortality in older men. AU - Wannamethee,S Goya, AU - Shaper,A Gerald, AU - Lennon,Lucy, PY - 2005/5/11/pubmed PY - 2005/6/9/medline PY - 2005/5/11/entrez SP - 1035 EP - 40 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 165 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: We have examined the relationship between intentional and unintentional weight loss and the reasons underlying intention to lose weight and all-cause mortality and mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and non-CVD causes in older men. METHODS: Prospective study of 4869 men aged 56 to 75 years drawn from general practices in 24 British towns, who in 1996 completed questionnaires about intentional and unintentional weight loss over the preceding 4 years and were followed up for a subsequent 7 years. RESULTS: Unintentional but not intentional weight loss was associated with a significant increase in risk of all-cause mortality compared with men who reported no weight change, even after adjustment for lifestyle characteristics and preexisting disease (adjusted relative risk [RR], 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-2.19; and RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.91-1.10, respectively). Men who lost weight intentionally as a result of personal choice showed significant benefit in all-cause mortality (RR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.34-1.00; P = .05), which was largely owing to a significant reduction in mortality from non-CVD causes (RR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15-0.87). The benefit in these men was most apparent in markedly overweight men (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters] > or = 28) and in younger men (age < 65 years). Men who lost weight intentionally owing to ill health or physician's advice showed an increased risk of all-cause mortality (RR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.96-1.94). No harm or benefit was seen for CVD mortality, irrespective of reasons for intentional weight loss. CONCLUSION: Intentional weight loss carried out for personal reasons is associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in markedly overweight men, and the data suggest that the earlier the intervention, the greater the chance of benefit. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15883243/Reasons_for_intentional_weight_loss_unintentional_weight_loss_and_mortality_in_older_men_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.165.9.1035 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -