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Electrophysiological correlates of facial decision: insights from upright and upside-down Mooney-face perception.
Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 2005 Aug; 24(3):663-73.BR

Abstract

We investigated the ERP correlates of the subjective perception of upright and upside-down ambiguous pictures as faces using two-tone Mooney stimuli in an explicit facial decision task (deciding whether a face is perceived or not in the display). The difficulty in perceiving upside-down Mooneys as faces was reflected by both lower rates of "Face" responses and delayed "Face" reaction times for upside-down relative to upright stimuli. The N170 was larger for the stimuli reported as "faces". It was also larger for the upright than the upside-down stimuli only when they were reported as faces. Furthermore, facial decision as well as stimulus orientation effects spread from 140-190 ms to 390-440 ms. The behavioural delay in 'Face' responses to upside-down stimuli was reflected in ERPs by later effect of facial decision for upside-down relative to upright Mooneys over occipito-temporal electrodes. Moreover, an orientation effect was observed only for the stimuli reported as faces; it yielded a marked hemispheric asymmetry, lasting from 140-190 ms to 390-440 ms post-stimulus onset in the left hemisphere and from 340-390 to 390-440 ms only in the right hemisphere. Taken together, the results supported a preferential involvement of the right hemisphere in the detection of faces, whatever their orientation. By contrast, the early orientation effect in the left hemisphere suggested that upside-down Mooney stimuli were processed as non face objects until facial decision was reached in this hemisphere. The present data show that face perception involves not only spatially but also temporally distributed activities in occipito-temporal regions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unité de Neurosciences Cognitives et Imagerie Cérébrale, CNRS UPR 640-LENA, Paris and Université Paris 6, Paris, France. Nathalie.George@chups.jussieu.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15890502

Citation

George, Nathalie, et al. "Electrophysiological Correlates of Facial Decision: Insights From Upright and Upside-down Mooney-face Perception." Brain Research. Cognitive Brain Research, vol. 24, no. 3, 2005, pp. 663-73.
George N, Jemel B, Fiori N, et al. Electrophysiological correlates of facial decision: insights from upright and upside-down Mooney-face perception. Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 2005;24(3):663-73.
George, N., Jemel, B., Fiori, N., Chaby, L., & Renault, B. (2005). Electrophysiological correlates of facial decision: insights from upright and upside-down Mooney-face perception. Brain Research. Cognitive Brain Research, 24(3), 663-73.
George N, et al. Electrophysiological Correlates of Facial Decision: Insights From Upright and Upside-down Mooney-face Perception. Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 2005;24(3):663-73. PubMed PMID: 15890502.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Electrophysiological correlates of facial decision: insights from upright and upside-down Mooney-face perception. AU - George,Nathalie, AU - Jemel,Boutheina, AU - Fiori,Nicole, AU - Chaby,Laurence, AU - Renault,Bernard, PY - 2004/06/15/received PY - 2005/03/22/revised PY - 2005/03/30/accepted PY - 2005/5/14/pubmed PY - 2005/10/14/medline PY - 2005/5/14/entrez SP - 663 EP - 73 JF - Brain research. Cognitive brain research JO - Brain Res Cogn Brain Res VL - 24 IS - 3 N2 - We investigated the ERP correlates of the subjective perception of upright and upside-down ambiguous pictures as faces using two-tone Mooney stimuli in an explicit facial decision task (deciding whether a face is perceived or not in the display). The difficulty in perceiving upside-down Mooneys as faces was reflected by both lower rates of "Face" responses and delayed "Face" reaction times for upside-down relative to upright stimuli. The N170 was larger for the stimuli reported as "faces". It was also larger for the upright than the upside-down stimuli only when they were reported as faces. Furthermore, facial decision as well as stimulus orientation effects spread from 140-190 ms to 390-440 ms. The behavioural delay in 'Face' responses to upside-down stimuli was reflected in ERPs by later effect of facial decision for upside-down relative to upright Mooneys over occipito-temporal electrodes. Moreover, an orientation effect was observed only for the stimuli reported as faces; it yielded a marked hemispheric asymmetry, lasting from 140-190 ms to 390-440 ms post-stimulus onset in the left hemisphere and from 340-390 to 390-440 ms only in the right hemisphere. Taken together, the results supported a preferential involvement of the right hemisphere in the detection of faces, whatever their orientation. By contrast, the early orientation effect in the left hemisphere suggested that upside-down Mooney stimuli were processed as non face objects until facial decision was reached in this hemisphere. The present data show that face perception involves not only spatially but also temporally distributed activities in occipito-temporal regions. SN - 0926-6410 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15890502/Electrophysiological_correlates_of_facial_decision:_insights_from_upright_and_upside_down_Mooney_face_perception_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0926-6410(05)00105-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -