Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

How alert are hospital doctors to alcohol misuse among acute orthopaedic patients?
N Z Med J 1992; 105(933):167-9NZ

Abstract

The notes of 100 acute orthopaedic admissions were examined to discover the number of cases in which doctors considered, identified or addressed problems of alcohol misuse. The adequacy with which routine drinking histories were recorded was also examined. Overall, 17.5% of male and 4% of female patients were identified as misusing alcohol; however action was taken in only 36% of these identified cases. Action tended to be taken in cases of chronic alcohol dependency (withdrawal management) or concomitant psychiatric illness (referral to specialist). No action was taken in other cases even when the admission was identified as alcohol related. Admissions identified as alcohol related were significantly more likely (chi 2, p = 0.0002) to have had a previous adult hospital stay compared with admissions not identified as alcohol related. Only 37% of all patients had an adequate routine drinking history recorded. These results corroborate previous research findings and suggest that New Zealand hospital doctors are inconsistent in identifying and addressing alcohol misuse. The results are discussed in the light of current societal norms which condone alcohol misuse. Possible changes in medical school teaching on alcohol are suggested.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Liaison Psychiatric Service, Dunedin Hospital.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1589159

Citation

Hamilton, M R., and D B. Menkes. "How Alert Are Hospital Doctors to Alcohol Misuse Among Acute Orthopaedic Patients?" The New Zealand Medical Journal, vol. 105, no. 933, 1992, pp. 167-9.
Hamilton MR, Menkes DB. How alert are hospital doctors to alcohol misuse among acute orthopaedic patients? N Z Med J. 1992;105(933):167-9.
Hamilton, M. R., & Menkes, D. B. (1992). How alert are hospital doctors to alcohol misuse among acute orthopaedic patients? The New Zealand Medical Journal, 105(933), pp. 167-9.
Hamilton MR, Menkes DB. How Alert Are Hospital Doctors to Alcohol Misuse Among Acute Orthopaedic Patients. N Z Med J. 1992 May 13;105(933):167-9. PubMed PMID: 1589159.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How alert are hospital doctors to alcohol misuse among acute orthopaedic patients? AU - Hamilton,M R, AU - Menkes,D B, PY - 1992/5/13/pubmed PY - 1992/5/13/medline PY - 1992/5/13/entrez SP - 167 EP - 9 JF - The New Zealand medical journal JO - N. Z. Med. J. VL - 105 IS - 933 N2 - The notes of 100 acute orthopaedic admissions were examined to discover the number of cases in which doctors considered, identified or addressed problems of alcohol misuse. The adequacy with which routine drinking histories were recorded was also examined. Overall, 17.5% of male and 4% of female patients were identified as misusing alcohol; however action was taken in only 36% of these identified cases. Action tended to be taken in cases of chronic alcohol dependency (withdrawal management) or concomitant psychiatric illness (referral to specialist). No action was taken in other cases even when the admission was identified as alcohol related. Admissions identified as alcohol related were significantly more likely (chi 2, p = 0.0002) to have had a previous adult hospital stay compared with admissions not identified as alcohol related. Only 37% of all patients had an adequate routine drinking history recorded. These results corroborate previous research findings and suggest that New Zealand hospital doctors are inconsistent in identifying and addressing alcohol misuse. The results are discussed in the light of current societal norms which condone alcohol misuse. Possible changes in medical school teaching on alcohol are suggested. SN - 0028-8446 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1589159/How_alert_are_hospital_doctors_to_alcohol_misuse_among_acute_orthopaedic_patients L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/alcoholusedisorderaud.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -