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Human factors analysis and classification system applied to civil aircraft accidents in India.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005 May; 76(5):501-5.AS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) has gained wide acceptance as a tool to classify human factors in aircraft accidents and incidents. This study on application of HFACS to civil aircraft accident reports at Directorate General Civil of Aviation (DGCA), India, was conducted to ascertain the practicability of applying HFACS to existing investigation reports and to analyze the trends of human factor causes of civil aircraft accidents.

METHOD

Accident investigation reports held at DGCA, New Delhi, for the period 1990--99 were scrutinized. In all, 83 accidents occurred during this period, of which 48 accident reports were evaluated in this study.

RESULTS

One or more human factors contributed to 37 of the 48 (77.1%) accidents. The commonest unsafe act was 'skill based errors' followed by 'decision errors.' Violations of laid down rules were contributory in 16 cases (33.3%). 'Preconditions for unsafe acts' were seen in 23 of the 48 cases (47.9%). A fairly large number (52.1%) had 'organizational influences' contributing to the accident.

DISCUSSION

These results are in consonance with larger studies of accidents in the U.S. Navy and general aviation. Such a high percentage of 'organizational influences' has not been reported in other studies. This is a healthy sign for Indian civil aviation, provided effective remedial action for the same is undertaken.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Directorate General Medical Services (Air), New Delhi, India. drdeepakgaur@yahoo.co.in

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15892552

Citation

Gaur, Deepak. "Human Factors Analysis and Classification System Applied to Civil Aircraft Accidents in India." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 76, no. 5, 2005, pp. 501-5.
Gaur D. Human factors analysis and classification system applied to civil aircraft accidents in India. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005;76(5):501-5.
Gaur, D. (2005). Human factors analysis and classification system applied to civil aircraft accidents in India. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 76(5), 501-5.
Gaur D. Human Factors Analysis and Classification System Applied to Civil Aircraft Accidents in India. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005;76(5):501-5. PubMed PMID: 15892552.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human factors analysis and classification system applied to civil aircraft accidents in India. A1 - Gaur,Deepak, PY - 2005/5/17/pubmed PY - 2005/8/2/medline PY - 2005/5/17/entrez SP - 501 EP - 5 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 76 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) has gained wide acceptance as a tool to classify human factors in aircraft accidents and incidents. This study on application of HFACS to civil aircraft accident reports at Directorate General Civil of Aviation (DGCA), India, was conducted to ascertain the practicability of applying HFACS to existing investigation reports and to analyze the trends of human factor causes of civil aircraft accidents. METHOD: Accident investigation reports held at DGCA, New Delhi, for the period 1990--99 were scrutinized. In all, 83 accidents occurred during this period, of which 48 accident reports were evaluated in this study. RESULTS: One or more human factors contributed to 37 of the 48 (77.1%) accidents. The commonest unsafe act was 'skill based errors' followed by 'decision errors.' Violations of laid down rules were contributory in 16 cases (33.3%). 'Preconditions for unsafe acts' were seen in 23 of the 48 cases (47.9%). A fairly large number (52.1%) had 'organizational influences' contributing to the accident. DISCUSSION: These results are in consonance with larger studies of accidents in the U.S. Navy and general aviation. Such a high percentage of 'organizational influences' has not been reported in other studies. This is a healthy sign for Indian civil aviation, provided effective remedial action for the same is undertaken. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15892552/Human_factors_analysis_and_classification_system_applied_to_civil_aircraft_accidents_in_India_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0095-6562&volume=76&issue=5&spage=501&aulast=Gaur DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -