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Event-related brain potentials and affective responses to threat in spider/snake-phobic and non-phobic subjects.
Int J Psychophysiol. 2005 Jul; 57(1):43-52.IJ

Abstract

We investigated cortical responses and valence/arousal ratings of spider phobic, snake phobic, and healthy subjects while they were processing feared, fear-relevant, emotional neutral, and pleasant stimuli. Results revealed significantly larger amplitudes of late ERP components (P3 and late positive complex, LPC) but not of early components (N1, P2, N2) in phobics when subjects were processing feared stimuli. This fear-associated increase of amplitudes of late ERP components in phobic subjects was maximal at centro-parietal and occipital brain sites. Furthermore, phobics but not controls rated feared stimuli to be more negative and arousing than fear-relevant, emotional neutral, and pleasant stimuli. Since late ERP components and valence/arousal ratings were only significantly increased when phobic subjects but not when healthy controls were processing feared stimuli, the present data suggest that P3 and LPC amplitudes represent useful neural correlates of the emotional significance and meaning of stimuli.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biological and Clinical Psychology, Friedrich Schiller University, Am Steiger 3//1, D-07743 Jena, Germany. wolfgang.miltner@uni-jena.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15896860

Citation

Miltner, Wolfgang H R., et al. "Event-related Brain Potentials and Affective Responses to Threat in Spider/snake-phobic and Non-phobic Subjects." International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, vol. 57, no. 1, 2005, pp. 43-52.
Miltner WH, Trippe RH, Krieschel S, et al. Event-related brain potentials and affective responses to threat in spider/snake-phobic and non-phobic subjects. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005;57(1):43-52.
Miltner, W. H., Trippe, R. H., Krieschel, S., Gutberlet, I., Hecht, H., & Weiss, T. (2005). Event-related brain potentials and affective responses to threat in spider/snake-phobic and non-phobic subjects. International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, 57(1), 43-52.
Miltner WH, et al. Event-related Brain Potentials and Affective Responses to Threat in Spider/snake-phobic and Non-phobic Subjects. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005;57(1):43-52. PubMed PMID: 15896860.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Event-related brain potentials and affective responses to threat in spider/snake-phobic and non-phobic subjects. AU - Miltner,Wolfgang H R, AU - Trippe,Ralf H, AU - Krieschel,Silke, AU - Gutberlet,Ingmar, AU - Hecht,Holger, AU - Weiss,Thomas, PY - 2004/11/10/received PY - 2005/01/25/revised PY - 2005/01/27/accepted PY - 2005/5/18/pubmed PY - 2005/7/28/medline PY - 2005/5/18/entrez SP - 43 EP - 52 JF - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology JO - Int J Psychophysiol VL - 57 IS - 1 N2 - We investigated cortical responses and valence/arousal ratings of spider phobic, snake phobic, and healthy subjects while they were processing feared, fear-relevant, emotional neutral, and pleasant stimuli. Results revealed significantly larger amplitudes of late ERP components (P3 and late positive complex, LPC) but not of early components (N1, P2, N2) in phobics when subjects were processing feared stimuli. This fear-associated increase of amplitudes of late ERP components in phobic subjects was maximal at centro-parietal and occipital brain sites. Furthermore, phobics but not controls rated feared stimuli to be more negative and arousing than fear-relevant, emotional neutral, and pleasant stimuli. Since late ERP components and valence/arousal ratings were only significantly increased when phobic subjects but not when healthy controls were processing feared stimuli, the present data suggest that P3 and LPC amplitudes represent useful neural correlates of the emotional significance and meaning of stimuli. SN - 0167-8760 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15896860/Event_related_brain_potentials_and_affective_responses_to_threat_in_spider/snake_phobic_and_non_phobic_subjects_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-8760(05)00057-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -