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Human coronavirus NL63 employs the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus receptor for cellular entry.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 May 31; 102(22):7988-93.PN

Abstract

Coronavirus (CoV) infection of humans is usually not associated with severe disease. However, discovery of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV revealed that highly pathogenic human CoVs (HCoVs) can evolve. The identification and characterization of new HCoVs is, therefore, an important task. Recently, a HCoV termed NL63 was discovered in patients with respiratory tract illness. Here, cell tropism and receptor usage of HCoV-NL63 were analyzed. The NL63 spike (S) protein mediated infection of different target cells compared with the closely related 229E-S protein but facilitated entry into cells known to be permissive to SARS-CoV-S-driven infection. An analysis of receptor engagement revealed that NL63-S binds angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2, the receptor for SARS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 uses ACE2 as a receptor for infection of target cells. Potent neutralizing activity directed against NL63- but not 229E-S protein was detected in virtually all sera from patients 8 years of age or older, suggesting that HCoV-NL63 infection of humans is common and usually acquired during childhood. Here, we show that SARS-CoV shares its receptor ACE2 with HCoV-NL63. Because the two viruses differ dramatically in their ability to induce disease, analysis of HCoV-NL63 might unravel pathogenicity factors in SARS-CoV. The frequent HCoV-NL63 infection of humans suggests that highly pathogenic variants have ample opportunity to evolve, underlining the need for vaccines against HCoVs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Clinical and Molecular Virology and Nikolaus Fiebiger Center, University Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15897467

Citation

Hofmann, Heike, et al. "Human Coronavirus NL63 Employs the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Receptor for Cellular Entry." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 102, no. 22, 2005, pp. 7988-93.
Hofmann H, Pyrc K, van der Hoek L, et al. Human coronavirus NL63 employs the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus receptor for cellular entry. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2005;102(22):7988-93.
Hofmann, H., Pyrc, K., van der Hoek, L., Geier, M., Berkhout, B., & Pöhlmann, S. (2005). Human coronavirus NL63 employs the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus receptor for cellular entry. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102(22), 7988-93.
Hofmann H, et al. Human Coronavirus NL63 Employs the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Receptor for Cellular Entry. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2005 May 31;102(22):7988-93. PubMed PMID: 15897467.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human coronavirus NL63 employs the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus receptor for cellular entry. AU - Hofmann,Heike, AU - Pyrc,Krzysztof, AU - van der Hoek,Lia, AU - Geier,Martina, AU - Berkhout,Ben, AU - Pöhlmann,Stefan, Y1 - 2005/05/16/ PY - 2005/5/18/pubmed PY - 2005/8/17/medline PY - 2005/5/18/entrez SP - 7988 EP - 93 JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America JO - Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. VL - 102 IS - 22 N2 - Coronavirus (CoV) infection of humans is usually not associated with severe disease. However, discovery of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV revealed that highly pathogenic human CoVs (HCoVs) can evolve. The identification and characterization of new HCoVs is, therefore, an important task. Recently, a HCoV termed NL63 was discovered in patients with respiratory tract illness. Here, cell tropism and receptor usage of HCoV-NL63 were analyzed. The NL63 spike (S) protein mediated infection of different target cells compared with the closely related 229E-S protein but facilitated entry into cells known to be permissive to SARS-CoV-S-driven infection. An analysis of receptor engagement revealed that NL63-S binds angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2, the receptor for SARS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 uses ACE2 as a receptor for infection of target cells. Potent neutralizing activity directed against NL63- but not 229E-S protein was detected in virtually all sera from patients 8 years of age or older, suggesting that HCoV-NL63 infection of humans is common and usually acquired during childhood. Here, we show that SARS-CoV shares its receptor ACE2 with HCoV-NL63. Because the two viruses differ dramatically in their ability to induce disease, analysis of HCoV-NL63 might unravel pathogenicity factors in SARS-CoV. The frequent HCoV-NL63 infection of humans suggests that highly pathogenic variants have ample opportunity to evolve, underlining the need for vaccines against HCoVs. SN - 0027-8424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15897467/Human_coronavirus_NL63_employs_the_severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus_receptor_for_cellular_entry_ L2 - http://www.pnas.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15897467 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -