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Maggot therapy in "lower-extremity hospice" wound care: fewer amputations and more antibiotic-free days.
J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 2005 May-Jun; 95(3):254-7JA

Abstract

We sought to assess, in a case-control model, the potential efficacy of maggot debridement therapy in 60 nonambulatory patients (mean +/- SD age, 72.2 +/- 6.8 years) with neuroischemic diabetic foot wounds (University of Texas grade C or D wounds below the malleoli) and peripheral vascular disease. Twenty-seven of these patients (45%) healed during 6 months of review. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients healing in the maggot debridement therapy versus control group (57% versus 33%). Of patients who healed, time to healing was significantly shorter in the maggot therapy than in the control group (18.5 +/- 4.8 versus 22.4 +/- 4.4 weeks). Approximately one in five patients (22%) underwent a high-level (above-the-foot) amputation. Patients in the control group were three times as likely to undergo amputation (33% versus 10%). Although there was no significant difference in infection prevalence in patients undergoing maggot therapy versus controls (80% versus 60%), there were significantly more antibiotic-free days during follow-up in patients who received maggot therapy (126.8 +/- 30.3 versus 81.9 +/- 42.1 days). Maggot debridement therapy reduces short-term morbidity in nonambulatory patients with diabetic foot wounds.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Podiatry Section, Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Tucson, AZ, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15901812

Citation

Armstrong, David G., et al. "Maggot Therapy in "lower-extremity Hospice" Wound Care: Fewer Amputations and More Antibiotic-free Days." Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, vol. 95, no. 3, 2005, pp. 254-7.
Armstrong DG, Salas P, Short B, et al. Maggot therapy in "lower-extremity hospice" wound care: fewer amputations and more antibiotic-free days. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2005;95(3):254-7.
Armstrong, D. G., Salas, P., Short, B., Martin, B. R., Kimbriel, H. R., Nixon, B. P., & Boulton, A. J. (2005). Maggot therapy in "lower-extremity hospice" wound care: fewer amputations and more antibiotic-free days. Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, 95(3), pp. 254-7.
Armstrong DG, et al. Maggot Therapy in "lower-extremity Hospice" Wound Care: Fewer Amputations and More Antibiotic-free Days. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2005;95(3):254-7. PubMed PMID: 15901812.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maggot therapy in "lower-extremity hospice" wound care: fewer amputations and more antibiotic-free days. AU - Armstrong,David G, AU - Salas,Precious, AU - Short,Brian, AU - Martin,Billy R, AU - Kimbriel,Heather R, AU - Nixon,Brent P, AU - Boulton,Andrew J M, PY - 2005/5/20/pubmed PY - 2005/8/17/medline PY - 2005/5/20/entrez SP - 254 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association JO - J Am Podiatr Med Assoc VL - 95 IS - 3 N2 - We sought to assess, in a case-control model, the potential efficacy of maggot debridement therapy in 60 nonambulatory patients (mean +/- SD age, 72.2 +/- 6.8 years) with neuroischemic diabetic foot wounds (University of Texas grade C or D wounds below the malleoli) and peripheral vascular disease. Twenty-seven of these patients (45%) healed during 6 months of review. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients healing in the maggot debridement therapy versus control group (57% versus 33%). Of patients who healed, time to healing was significantly shorter in the maggot therapy than in the control group (18.5 +/- 4.8 versus 22.4 +/- 4.4 weeks). Approximately one in five patients (22%) underwent a high-level (above-the-foot) amputation. Patients in the control group were three times as likely to undergo amputation (33% versus 10%). Although there was no significant difference in infection prevalence in patients undergoing maggot therapy versus controls (80% versus 60%), there were significantly more antibiotic-free days during follow-up in patients who received maggot therapy (126.8 +/- 30.3 versus 81.9 +/- 42.1 days). Maggot debridement therapy reduces short-term morbidity in nonambulatory patients with diabetic foot wounds. SN - 8750-7315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15901812/Maggot_therapy_in_"lower_extremity_hospice"_wound_care:_fewer_amputations_and_more_antibiotic_free_days_ L2 - http://www.japmaonline.org/doi/10.7547/0950254?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -