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Human coronavirus NL63 infection and other coronavirus infections in children hospitalized with acute respiratory disease in Hong Kong, China.
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Jun 15; 40(12):1721-9.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) is a recently discovered human coronavirus found to cause respiratory illness in children and adults that is distinct from the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and human coronaviruses 229E (HCoV-229E) and OC43 (HCoV-OC43).

METHODS

We investigated the role that HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43, and HCoV-229E played in children hospitalized with fever and acute respiratory symptoms in Hong Kong during the period from August 2001 through August 2002.

RESULTS

Coronavirus infections were detected in 26 (4.4%) of 587 children studied; 15 (2.6%) were positive for HCoV-NL63, 9 (1.5%) were positive for HCoV-OC43, and 2 (0.3%) were positive for HCoV-229E. In addition to causing upper respiratory disease, we found that HCoV-NL63 can present as croup, asthma exacerbation, febrile seizures, and high fever. The mean age (+/- standard deviation [SD]) of the infected children was 30.7 +/- 19.8 months (range, 6-57 months). The mean maximum temperature (+/- SD) for the 12 children who were febrile was 39.3 degrees C +/- 0.9 degrees C, and the mean total duration of fever (+/- SD) for all children was 2.6 +/- 1.2 days (range, 1-5 days). HCoV-NL63 infections were noted in the spring and summer months of 2002, whereas HCoV-OC43 infection mainly occurred in the fall and winter months of 2001. HCoV-NL63 viruses appeared to cluster into 2 evolutionary lineages, and viruses from both lineages cocirculated in the same season.

CONCLUSIONS

HCoV-NL63 is a significant pathogen that contributes to the hospitalization of children, and it was estimated to have caused 224 hospital admissions per 100,000 population aged < or = 6 years each year in Hong Kong.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15909257

Citation

Chiu, Susan S., et al. "Human Coronavirus NL63 Infection and Other Coronavirus Infections in Children Hospitalized With Acute Respiratory Disease in Hong Kong, China." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 40, no. 12, 2005, pp. 1721-9.
Chiu SS, Chan KH, Chu KW, et al. Human coronavirus NL63 infection and other coronavirus infections in children hospitalized with acute respiratory disease in Hong Kong, China. Clin Infect Dis. 2005;40(12):1721-9.
Chiu, S. S., Chan, K. H., Chu, K. W., Kwan, S. W., Guan, Y., Poon, L. L., & Peiris, J. S. (2005). Human coronavirus NL63 infection and other coronavirus infections in children hospitalized with acute respiratory disease in Hong Kong, China. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 40(12), 1721-9.
Chiu SS, et al. Human Coronavirus NL63 Infection and Other Coronavirus Infections in Children Hospitalized With Acute Respiratory Disease in Hong Kong, China. Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Jun 15;40(12):1721-9. PubMed PMID: 15909257.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human coronavirus NL63 infection and other coronavirus infections in children hospitalized with acute respiratory disease in Hong Kong, China. AU - Chiu,Susan S, AU - Chan,Kwok Hung, AU - Chu,Ka Wing, AU - Kwan,See Wai, AU - Guan,Yi, AU - Poon,Leo Lit Man, AU - Peiris,J S M, Y1 - 2005/05/10/ PY - 2004/09/20/received PY - 2005/01/27/accepted PY - 2005/5/24/pubmed PY - 2006/9/19/medline PY - 2005/5/24/entrez SP - 1721 EP - 9 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 40 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) is a recently discovered human coronavirus found to cause respiratory illness in children and adults that is distinct from the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and human coronaviruses 229E (HCoV-229E) and OC43 (HCoV-OC43). METHODS: We investigated the role that HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43, and HCoV-229E played in children hospitalized with fever and acute respiratory symptoms in Hong Kong during the period from August 2001 through August 2002. RESULTS: Coronavirus infections were detected in 26 (4.4%) of 587 children studied; 15 (2.6%) were positive for HCoV-NL63, 9 (1.5%) were positive for HCoV-OC43, and 2 (0.3%) were positive for HCoV-229E. In addition to causing upper respiratory disease, we found that HCoV-NL63 can present as croup, asthma exacerbation, febrile seizures, and high fever. The mean age (+/- standard deviation [SD]) of the infected children was 30.7 +/- 19.8 months (range, 6-57 months). The mean maximum temperature (+/- SD) for the 12 children who were febrile was 39.3 degrees C +/- 0.9 degrees C, and the mean total duration of fever (+/- SD) for all children was 2.6 +/- 1.2 days (range, 1-5 days). HCoV-NL63 infections were noted in the spring and summer months of 2002, whereas HCoV-OC43 infection mainly occurred in the fall and winter months of 2001. HCoV-NL63 viruses appeared to cluster into 2 evolutionary lineages, and viruses from both lineages cocirculated in the same season. CONCLUSIONS: HCoV-NL63 is a significant pathogen that contributes to the hospitalization of children, and it was estimated to have caused 224 hospital admissions per 100,000 population aged < or = 6 years each year in Hong Kong. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15909257/Human_coronavirus_NL63_infection_and_other_coronavirus_infections_in_children_hospitalized_with_acute_respiratory_disease_in_Hong_Kong_China_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/430301 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -