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Obesity does not adversely affect health-related quality-of-life outcomes after anatomic retropubic radical prostatectomy.
Urology. 2005 Jun; 65(6):1131-6.U

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To study the impact of obesity on the health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP).

METHODS

Patient-reported sexual and urinary HRQOL was assessed at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after anatomic retropubic RP using the University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index among a cohort of 340 men. Linear regression analysis was used to compare the longitudinal HRQOL scores by body mass index (BMI) adjusting for age, baseline HRQOL, and nerve-sparing status (non-nerve sparing versus unilateral versus bilateral).

RESULTS

At baseline, the sexual and urinary function and bother scores were similar between normal-weight (BMI less than 25 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m2), and obese (BMI 30 kg/m2 or greater) men. Obese men were as likely to undergo bilateral nerve-sparing surgery as men with a lower BMI. After adjustment for age, baseline HRQOL, and nerve-sparing status, no statistically significant differences were found in any HRQOL score at any point among the BMI groups, except for a lower urinary function score at 24 months among overweight men (P = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

In a select group of men undergoing RP at a tertiary care referral center, BMI was, in general, unrelated to the baseline and longitudinal postoperative HRQOL scores. Obese men (BMI 30 to 35 kg/m2) should not be selectively discouraged against RP because of concerns about HRQOL. Additional studies are needed to assess the HRQOL outcomes among men with very high BMI values (greater than 35 kg/m2).

Authors+Show Affiliations

James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287-2101, USA. sfreedl1@jhmi.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15913722

Citation

Freedland, Stephen J., et al. "Obesity Does Not Adversely Affect Health-related Quality-of-life Outcomes After Anatomic Retropubic Radical Prostatectomy." Urology, vol. 65, no. 6, 2005, pp. 1131-6.
Freedland SJ, Haffner MC, Landis PK, et al. Obesity does not adversely affect health-related quality-of-life outcomes after anatomic retropubic radical prostatectomy. Urology. 2005;65(6):1131-6.
Freedland, S. J., Haffner, M. C., Landis, P. K., Saigal, C. S., & Carter, H. B. (2005). Obesity does not adversely affect health-related quality-of-life outcomes after anatomic retropubic radical prostatectomy. Urology, 65(6), 1131-6.
Freedland SJ, et al. Obesity Does Not Adversely Affect Health-related Quality-of-life Outcomes After Anatomic Retropubic Radical Prostatectomy. Urology. 2005;65(6):1131-6. PubMed PMID: 15913722.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity does not adversely affect health-related quality-of-life outcomes after anatomic retropubic radical prostatectomy. AU - Freedland,Stephen J, AU - Haffner,Michael C, AU - Landis,Patricia K, AU - Saigal,Christopher S, AU - Carter,H Ballentine, PY - 2004/11/04/received PY - 2004/12/09/revised PY - 2004/12/23/accepted PY - 2005/5/26/pubmed PY - 2005/12/15/medline PY - 2005/5/26/entrez SP - 1131 EP - 6 JF - Urology JO - Urology VL - 65 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of obesity on the health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP). METHODS: Patient-reported sexual and urinary HRQOL was assessed at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after anatomic retropubic RP using the University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index among a cohort of 340 men. Linear regression analysis was used to compare the longitudinal HRQOL scores by body mass index (BMI) adjusting for age, baseline HRQOL, and nerve-sparing status (non-nerve sparing versus unilateral versus bilateral). RESULTS: At baseline, the sexual and urinary function and bother scores were similar between normal-weight (BMI less than 25 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m2), and obese (BMI 30 kg/m2 or greater) men. Obese men were as likely to undergo bilateral nerve-sparing surgery as men with a lower BMI. After adjustment for age, baseline HRQOL, and nerve-sparing status, no statistically significant differences were found in any HRQOL score at any point among the BMI groups, except for a lower urinary function score at 24 months among overweight men (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: In a select group of men undergoing RP at a tertiary care referral center, BMI was, in general, unrelated to the baseline and longitudinal postoperative HRQOL scores. Obese men (BMI 30 to 35 kg/m2) should not be selectively discouraged against RP because of concerns about HRQOL. Additional studies are needed to assess the HRQOL outcomes among men with very high BMI values (greater than 35 kg/m2). SN - 1527-9995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15913722/Obesity_does_not_adversely_affect_health_related_quality_of_life_outcomes_after_anatomic_retropubic_radical_prostatectomy_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0090-4295(04)01538-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -