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Investigation of mechanisms linking media exposure to smoking in high school students.
Prev Med. 2005 Aug; 41(2):511-20.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Media exposure has been found to impact adolescent smoking, although the mechanisms of this relationship have not been thoroughly investigated. Drive for thinness and tobacco advertising receptivity, both shown to be associated with smoking, are two potential mediators.

METHODS

967 twelfth grade students completed a self-report survey as part of a longitudinal study of biobehavioral predictors of smoking. Exposure to magazines and television, drive for thinness, tobacco advertisement receptivity, and twelfth grade smoking level were the primary variables of interest. Effects of gender, race, BMI, smoking exposure, and perceived physical appearance were controlled for in the model.

RESULTS

Exposure to fashion, entertainment, and gossip magazines had indirect effects on smoking via drive for thinness and tobacco advertisement receptivity. There was a direct effect of health, fitness, and sports magazine reading on smoking. Television watching had no significant effects on smoking.

CONCLUSIONS

Adolescents who read fashion, entertainment, and gossip magazines may be more likely to smoke, in part, because of a higher drive for thinness and greater receptivity to cigarette advertisements. Conversely, adolescents reading Health and Fitness magazines may be less likely to smoke. Drive for thinness and tobacco advertising receptivity are thus potential targets for adolescent smoking intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15917047

Citation

Carson, Nicholas J., et al. "Investigation of Mechanisms Linking Media Exposure to Smoking in High School Students." Preventive Medicine, vol. 41, no. 2, 2005, pp. 511-20.
Carson NJ, Rodriguez D, Audrain-McGovern J. Investigation of mechanisms linking media exposure to smoking in high school students. Prev Med. 2005;41(2):511-20.
Carson, N. J., Rodriguez, D., & Audrain-McGovern, J. (2005). Investigation of mechanisms linking media exposure to smoking in high school students. Preventive Medicine, 41(2), 511-20.
Carson NJ, Rodriguez D, Audrain-McGovern J. Investigation of Mechanisms Linking Media Exposure to Smoking in High School Students. Prev Med. 2005;41(2):511-20. PubMed PMID: 15917047.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Investigation of mechanisms linking media exposure to smoking in high school students. AU - Carson,Nicholas J, AU - Rodriguez,Daniel, AU - Audrain-McGovern,Janet, PY - 2004/06/23/received PY - 2004/09/16/revised PY - 2005/01/04/accepted PY - 2005/5/27/pubmed PY - 2005/10/18/medline PY - 2005/5/27/entrez SP - 511 EP - 20 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 41 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Media exposure has been found to impact adolescent smoking, although the mechanisms of this relationship have not been thoroughly investigated. Drive for thinness and tobacco advertising receptivity, both shown to be associated with smoking, are two potential mediators. METHODS: 967 twelfth grade students completed a self-report survey as part of a longitudinal study of biobehavioral predictors of smoking. Exposure to magazines and television, drive for thinness, tobacco advertisement receptivity, and twelfth grade smoking level were the primary variables of interest. Effects of gender, race, BMI, smoking exposure, and perceived physical appearance were controlled for in the model. RESULTS: Exposure to fashion, entertainment, and gossip magazines had indirect effects on smoking via drive for thinness and tobacco advertisement receptivity. There was a direct effect of health, fitness, and sports magazine reading on smoking. Television watching had no significant effects on smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents who read fashion, entertainment, and gossip magazines may be more likely to smoke, in part, because of a higher drive for thinness and greater receptivity to cigarette advertisements. Conversely, adolescents reading Health and Fitness magazines may be less likely to smoke. Drive for thinness and tobacco advertising receptivity are thus potential targets for adolescent smoking intervention. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15917047/Investigation_of_mechanisms_linking_media_exposure_to_smoking_in_high_school_students_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(05)00008-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -