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History of weight and obesity through life and risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia.
Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jul; 29(7):798-803.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The relation of anthropometric measures, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) risk was investigated.

DESIGN

Hospital-based case-control study.

SUBJECTS

Cases were 1369 men with histologically confirmed BPH, and controls were 1451 men below 75 y, admitted to hospital for acute non-neoplastic diseases.

MEASUREMENTS

Using a structured questionnaire, trained interviewers collected information on self-reported height and weight, and measured waist and hip circumference of patients. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional multiple logistic regression models.

RESULTS

Compared to the corresponding lowest quartile, the OR for the highest one were 0.76 (95% CI 0.59-0.98) for body weight, 0.71 (95% CI 0.54-0.94) for waist-to-hip ratio and 0.87 (95% CI 0.70-1.09) for body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)). Compared to a lowest lifelong BMI <20.7 kg/m(2), the OR was 1.56 (95% CI 1.25-1.95) for a lowest lifelong BMI > or =23.7 kg/m(2). The OR was 0.74 (95% CI 0.60-0.93) for a lifelong increase of BMI > or =6.1 kg/m(2), compared to <1.6 kg/m(2). No association emerged for history of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia.

CONCLUSIONS

Overweight was modestly, inversely related to BPH. The hypothesis of reduced testosterone levels in obese individuals may explain the different BPH risk and need to be tested.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unita di Epidemiologia e Biostatistica, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (PN), Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15917855

Citation

Zucchetto, A, et al. "History of Weight and Obesity Through Life and Risk of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 29, no. 7, 2005, pp. 798-803.
Zucchetto A, Tavani A, Dal Maso L, et al. History of weight and obesity through life and risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Int J Obes (Lond). 2005;29(7):798-803.
Zucchetto, A., Tavani, A., Dal Maso, L., Gallus, S., Negri, E., Talamini, R., Franceschi, S., Montella, M., & La Vecchia, C. (2005). History of weight and obesity through life and risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 29(7), 798-803.
Zucchetto A, et al. History of Weight and Obesity Through Life and Risk of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Int J Obes (Lond). 2005;29(7):798-803. PubMed PMID: 15917855.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - History of weight and obesity through life and risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia. AU - Zucchetto,A, AU - Tavani,A, AU - Dal Maso,L, AU - Gallus,S, AU - Negri,E, AU - Talamini,R, AU - Franceschi,S, AU - Montella,M, AU - La Vecchia,C, PY - 2005/5/27/pubmed PY - 2005/10/4/medline PY - 2005/5/27/entrez SP - 798 EP - 803 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 29 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The relation of anthropometric measures, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) risk was investigated. DESIGN: Hospital-based case-control study. SUBJECTS: Cases were 1369 men with histologically confirmed BPH, and controls were 1451 men below 75 y, admitted to hospital for acute non-neoplastic diseases. MEASUREMENTS: Using a structured questionnaire, trained interviewers collected information on self-reported height and weight, and measured waist and hip circumference of patients. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional multiple logistic regression models. RESULTS: Compared to the corresponding lowest quartile, the OR for the highest one were 0.76 (95% CI 0.59-0.98) for body weight, 0.71 (95% CI 0.54-0.94) for waist-to-hip ratio and 0.87 (95% CI 0.70-1.09) for body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)). Compared to a lowest lifelong BMI <20.7 kg/m(2), the OR was 1.56 (95% CI 1.25-1.95) for a lowest lifelong BMI > or =23.7 kg/m(2). The OR was 0.74 (95% CI 0.60-0.93) for a lifelong increase of BMI > or =6.1 kg/m(2), compared to <1.6 kg/m(2). No association emerged for history of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight was modestly, inversely related to BPH. The hypothesis of reduced testosterone levels in obese individuals may explain the different BPH risk and need to be tested. SN - 0307-0565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15917855/History_of_weight_and_obesity_through_life_and_risk_of_benign_prostatic_hyperplasia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802979 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -