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Waist circumference and body composition in relation to all-cause mortality in middle-aged men and women.
Int J Obes (Lond) 2005; 29(7):778-84IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Waist circumference is directly related to all-cause mortality when adjusted for body mass index (BMI). Body fat and fat-free body mass, when mutually adjusted, show with increasing values an increasing and decreasing relation to all-cause mortality. We investigated the association of waist circumference and body composition (body fat and fat-free mass), mutually adjusted, to all-cause mortality.

DESIGN

A Danish prospective cohort study with a median follow-up period of 5.8 y.

SUBJECTS

In all, 27 178 men and 29 875 women, born in Denmark, aged 50-64 y, and without diagnosis of cancer at the time of invitation.

MEASUREMENTS

Waist circumference and body composition estimated from impedance measurements. Cox's regression models were used to estimate the mortality rate ratios (RR).

RESULTS

Waist circumference was strongly associated with all-cause mortality after adjustment for body composition; the mortality RR was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.22-1.52) times higher per 10% larger waist circumference among men and 1.30 (95% CI: 1.17-1.44) times higher among women. Adjustment for waist circumference eliminated the association between high values of the body fat mass index (BFMI) and all-cause mortality. The association between fat-free mass index (FFMI) and mortality remained unaltered.

CONCLUSION

Waist circumference accounted for the mortality risk associated with excess body fat and not fat-free mass. Waist circumference remained strongly and directly associated with all-cause mortality when adjusted for total body fat in middle-aged men and women, suggesting that the increased mortality risk related to excess body fat is mainly due to abdominal adiposity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. j.bigaard@dadlnet.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15917857

Citation

Bigaard, J, et al. "Waist Circumference and Body Composition in Relation to All-cause Mortality in Middle-aged Men and Women." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 29, no. 7, 2005, pp. 778-84.
Bigaard J, Frederiksen K, Tjønneland A, et al. Waist circumference and body composition in relation to all-cause mortality in middle-aged men and women. Int J Obes (Lond). 2005;29(7):778-84.
Bigaard, J., Frederiksen, K., Tjønneland, A., Thomsen, B. L., Overvad, K., Heitmann, B. L., & Sørensen, T. I. (2005). Waist circumference and body composition in relation to all-cause mortality in middle-aged men and women. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 29(7), pp. 778-84.
Bigaard J, et al. Waist Circumference and Body Composition in Relation to All-cause Mortality in Middle-aged Men and Women. Int J Obes (Lond). 2005;29(7):778-84. PubMed PMID: 15917857.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Waist circumference and body composition in relation to all-cause mortality in middle-aged men and women. AU - Bigaard,J, AU - Frederiksen,K, AU - Tjønneland,A, AU - Thomsen,B L, AU - Overvad,K, AU - Heitmann,B L, AU - Sørensen,T I A, PY - 2005/5/27/pubmed PY - 2005/10/4/medline PY - 2005/5/27/entrez SP - 778 EP - 84 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 29 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Waist circumference is directly related to all-cause mortality when adjusted for body mass index (BMI). Body fat and fat-free body mass, when mutually adjusted, show with increasing values an increasing and decreasing relation to all-cause mortality. We investigated the association of waist circumference and body composition (body fat and fat-free mass), mutually adjusted, to all-cause mortality. DESIGN: A Danish prospective cohort study with a median follow-up period of 5.8 y. SUBJECTS: In all, 27 178 men and 29 875 women, born in Denmark, aged 50-64 y, and without diagnosis of cancer at the time of invitation. MEASUREMENTS: Waist circumference and body composition estimated from impedance measurements. Cox's regression models were used to estimate the mortality rate ratios (RR). RESULTS: Waist circumference was strongly associated with all-cause mortality after adjustment for body composition; the mortality RR was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.22-1.52) times higher per 10% larger waist circumference among men and 1.30 (95% CI: 1.17-1.44) times higher among women. Adjustment for waist circumference eliminated the association between high values of the body fat mass index (BFMI) and all-cause mortality. The association between fat-free mass index (FFMI) and mortality remained unaltered. CONCLUSION: Waist circumference accounted for the mortality risk associated with excess body fat and not fat-free mass. Waist circumference remained strongly and directly associated with all-cause mortality when adjusted for total body fat in middle-aged men and women, suggesting that the increased mortality risk related to excess body fat is mainly due to abdominal adiposity. SN - 0307-0565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15917857/Waist_circumference_and_body_composition_in_relation_to_all_cause_mortality_in_middle_aged_men_and_women_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802976 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -