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Newborn temperature during skin-to-skin breastfeeding in couples having breastfeeding difficulties.
Birth. 2005 Jun; 32(2):115-21.B

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Kangaroo (skin-to-skin contact) care facilitates the maintenance of safe temperatures in newborn infants. Concern persists that infants will become cold while breastfeeding, however, especially if in skin-to-skin contact with the mother. This concern might be especially realistic for infants experiencing breastfeeding difficulties. The objective was to measure temperature during a study of mothers and infants who were having breastfeeding difficulties during early postpartum and were given opportunities to experience skin-to-skin contact during breastfeeding.

METHOD

Forty-eight full-term infants were investigated using a pretest-test-posttest study design. Temporal artery temperature was measured before, after, and once during 3 consecutive skin-to-skin breastfeeding interventions and 1 intervention 24 hours after the first intervention.

RESULTS

During skin-to-skin contact, most infants reached and maintained temperatures between 36.5 and 37.6 degrees C, the thermoneutral range, with only rare exceptions.

CONCLUSIONS

The temperatures of study infants reached and remained at the thermoneutral range during breastfeeding in skin-to-skin contact. The data suggest that mothers may have the ability to modulate their infant's temperature during skin-to-skin contact if given the opportunity. Hospital staff and parents can be reassured that, with respect to their temperature, healthy newborn infants, with or without breastfeeding difficulties, may safely breastfeed in skin-to-skin contact with their mothers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Akron, College of Nursing, Akron, OH, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15918868

Citation

Chiu, Sheau-Huey, et al. "Newborn Temperature During Skin-to-skin Breastfeeding in Couples Having Breastfeeding Difficulties." Birth (Berkeley, Calif.), vol. 32, no. 2, 2005, pp. 115-21.
Chiu SH, Anderson GC, Burkhammer MD. Newborn temperature during skin-to-skin breastfeeding in couples having breastfeeding difficulties. Birth. 2005;32(2):115-21.
Chiu, S. H., Anderson, G. C., & Burkhammer, M. D. (2005). Newborn temperature during skin-to-skin breastfeeding in couples having breastfeeding difficulties. Birth (Berkeley, Calif.), 32(2), 115-21.
Chiu SH, Anderson GC, Burkhammer MD. Newborn Temperature During Skin-to-skin Breastfeeding in Couples Having Breastfeeding Difficulties. Birth. 2005;32(2):115-21. PubMed PMID: 15918868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Newborn temperature during skin-to-skin breastfeeding in couples having breastfeeding difficulties. AU - Chiu,Sheau-Huey, AU - Anderson,Gene Cranston, AU - Burkhammer,Maria D, PY - 2005/5/28/pubmed PY - 2005/9/1/medline PY - 2005/5/28/entrez SP - 115 EP - 21 JF - Birth (Berkeley, Calif.) JO - Birth VL - 32 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Kangaroo (skin-to-skin contact) care facilitates the maintenance of safe temperatures in newborn infants. Concern persists that infants will become cold while breastfeeding, however, especially if in skin-to-skin contact with the mother. This concern might be especially realistic for infants experiencing breastfeeding difficulties. The objective was to measure temperature during a study of mothers and infants who were having breastfeeding difficulties during early postpartum and were given opportunities to experience skin-to-skin contact during breastfeeding. METHOD: Forty-eight full-term infants were investigated using a pretest-test-posttest study design. Temporal artery temperature was measured before, after, and once during 3 consecutive skin-to-skin breastfeeding interventions and 1 intervention 24 hours after the first intervention. RESULTS: During skin-to-skin contact, most infants reached and maintained temperatures between 36.5 and 37.6 degrees C, the thermoneutral range, with only rare exceptions. CONCLUSIONS: The temperatures of study infants reached and remained at the thermoneutral range during breastfeeding in skin-to-skin contact. The data suggest that mothers may have the ability to modulate their infant's temperature during skin-to-skin contact if given the opportunity. Hospital staff and parents can be reassured that, with respect to their temperature, healthy newborn infants, with or without breastfeeding difficulties, may safely breastfeed in skin-to-skin contact with their mothers. SN - 0730-7659 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15918868/Newborn_temperature_during_skin_to_skin_breastfeeding_in_couples_having_breastfeeding_difficulties_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0730-7659.2005.00354.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -