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Role of parents and peers in influencing the smoking status of high school students in Taiwan.
Tob Control. 2005 Jun; 14 Suppl 1:i10-5.TC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess parental influence on smoking behaviour by high school students in an Asian culture and to compare the relative importance of parental and peer influence.

METHODS

A 5% nationally representative sample, including 44 976 high school students in 10th to 12th grade (aged 15-18 years) in Taiwan, were surveyed in 1995. Each completed a long self administered questionnaire. Parental influence was measured by examining both parental behaviour (smoking status) and attitudes (perceived "tender loving care" (TLC) by adolescents). Changes in smoking status were used to determine peer influence, defined as the increase in the likelihood of smoking from grade 10 to 12 in a steady state environment. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for parental and peer influence, using logistic regression.

RESULTS

Adolescents of smoking parents with low TLC had the highest smoking rates and those of non-smoking parents with high TLC had the lowest. The difference was more than twofold in boys and more than fourfold in girls. When either parental smoking status or TLC alone was considered, parental influence was similar to peer influence in boys, but larger than peer influence in girls. However, when smoking status and TLC were considered jointly, it became larger than peer influence for both groups (OR 2.8 v 1.8 for boys and OR 3.9 v 1.3 for girls).

CONCLUSION

When parental influence is taken as parental behaviour and attitude together, it plays a more important role than peer influence in smoking among high school students in Taiwan. This study, characterising such relationships among Asian populations for the first time, implies that future prevention programmes should direct more efforts toward the parental smoking and parent-child relationships, and not aim exclusively at adolescents in schools.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Health Policy Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan. cwengood@nhri.org.twNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15923441

Citation

Wen, C P., et al. "Role of Parents and Peers in Influencing the Smoking Status of High School Students in Taiwan." Tobacco Control, vol. 14 Suppl 1, 2005, pp. i10-5.
Wen CP, Tsai SP, Cheng TY, et al. Role of parents and peers in influencing the smoking status of high school students in Taiwan. Tob Control. 2005;14 Suppl 1:i10-5.
Wen, C. P., Tsai, S. P., Cheng, T. Y., Hsu, C. C., Chen, T., & Lin, H. S. (2005). Role of parents and peers in influencing the smoking status of high school students in Taiwan. Tobacco Control, 14 Suppl 1, i10-5.
Wen CP, et al. Role of Parents and Peers in Influencing the Smoking Status of High School Students in Taiwan. Tob Control. 2005;14 Suppl 1:i10-5. PubMed PMID: 15923441.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of parents and peers in influencing the smoking status of high school students in Taiwan. AU - Wen,C P, AU - Tsai,S P, AU - Cheng,T Y, AU - Hsu,C C, AU - Chen,T, AU - Lin,H S, PY - 2005/6/1/pubmed PY - 2005/7/21/medline PY - 2005/6/1/entrez SP - i10 EP - 5 JF - Tobacco control JO - Tob Control VL - 14 Suppl 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess parental influence on smoking behaviour by high school students in an Asian culture and to compare the relative importance of parental and peer influence. METHODS: A 5% nationally representative sample, including 44 976 high school students in 10th to 12th grade (aged 15-18 years) in Taiwan, were surveyed in 1995. Each completed a long self administered questionnaire. Parental influence was measured by examining both parental behaviour (smoking status) and attitudes (perceived "tender loving care" (TLC) by adolescents). Changes in smoking status were used to determine peer influence, defined as the increase in the likelihood of smoking from grade 10 to 12 in a steady state environment. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for parental and peer influence, using logistic regression. RESULTS: Adolescents of smoking parents with low TLC had the highest smoking rates and those of non-smoking parents with high TLC had the lowest. The difference was more than twofold in boys and more than fourfold in girls. When either parental smoking status or TLC alone was considered, parental influence was similar to peer influence in boys, but larger than peer influence in girls. However, when smoking status and TLC were considered jointly, it became larger than peer influence for both groups (OR 2.8 v 1.8 for boys and OR 3.9 v 1.3 for girls). CONCLUSION: When parental influence is taken as parental behaviour and attitude together, it plays a more important role than peer influence in smoking among high school students in Taiwan. This study, characterising such relationships among Asian populations for the first time, implies that future prevention programmes should direct more efforts toward the parental smoking and parent-child relationships, and not aim exclusively at adolescents in schools. SN - 1468-3318 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15923441/Role_of_parents_and_peers_in_influencing_the_smoking_status_of_high_school_students_in_Taiwan_ L2 - https://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15923441 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -