Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

State anxiety and affective physiology: effects of sustained exposure to affective pictures.
Biol Psychol. 2005 Jul; 69(3):247-60.BP

Abstract

Effects of sustained exposure to emotional stimuli on affective reactions and their recovery were examined to determine whether increasing exposure to a specific emotional content (e.g., unpleasant) cumulatively affects physiological responses; and whether motivational activation persists following sustained exposure. Participants viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS pictures, presented in blocks separated by an inter-block interval. With increasing exposure to unpleasant pictures, startle magnitude showed greater potentiation, and corrugator EMG activity increased. Both affective startle and corrugator modulation persisted following exposure to unpleasant pictures. The cumulative effects of sustained exposure to unpleasant pictures were enhanced for those reporting higher state anxiety, consistent with the hypothesis that sustained aversive exposure leads to increased defensive activation. These findings suggest sustained exposure to unpleasant pictures may induce a short-term mood state, and may be a useful paradigm to study individuals who vary in symptoms of anxiety.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention, PO Box 100165 HSC, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0165, USA. jcarson@ufl.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15925028

Citation

Smith, J Carson, et al. "State Anxiety and Affective Physiology: Effects of Sustained Exposure to Affective Pictures." Biological Psychology, vol. 69, no. 3, 2005, pp. 247-60.
Smith JC, Bradley MM, Lang PJ. State anxiety and affective physiology: effects of sustained exposure to affective pictures. Biol Psychol. 2005;69(3):247-60.
Smith, J. C., Bradley, M. M., & Lang, P. J. (2005). State anxiety and affective physiology: effects of sustained exposure to affective pictures. Biological Psychology, 69(3), 247-60.
Smith JC, Bradley MM, Lang PJ. State Anxiety and Affective Physiology: Effects of Sustained Exposure to Affective Pictures. Biol Psychol. 2005;69(3):247-60. PubMed PMID: 15925028.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - State anxiety and affective physiology: effects of sustained exposure to affective pictures. AU - Smith,J Carson, AU - Bradley,Margaret M, AU - Lang,Peter J, Y1 - 2004/12/21/ PY - 2004/06/16/received PY - 2004/09/21/accepted PY - 2005/6/1/pubmed PY - 2005/10/12/medline PY - 2005/6/1/entrez SP - 247 EP - 60 JF - Biological psychology JO - Biol Psychol VL - 69 IS - 3 N2 - Effects of sustained exposure to emotional stimuli on affective reactions and their recovery were examined to determine whether increasing exposure to a specific emotional content (e.g., unpleasant) cumulatively affects physiological responses; and whether motivational activation persists following sustained exposure. Participants viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS pictures, presented in blocks separated by an inter-block interval. With increasing exposure to unpleasant pictures, startle magnitude showed greater potentiation, and corrugator EMG activity increased. Both affective startle and corrugator modulation persisted following exposure to unpleasant pictures. The cumulative effects of sustained exposure to unpleasant pictures were enhanced for those reporting higher state anxiety, consistent with the hypothesis that sustained aversive exposure leads to increased defensive activation. These findings suggest sustained exposure to unpleasant pictures may induce a short-term mood state, and may be a useful paradigm to study individuals who vary in symptoms of anxiety. SN - 0301-0511 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15925028/State_anxiety_and_affective_physiology:_effects_of_sustained_exposure_to_affective_pictures_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0301-0511(04)00157-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -