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Apparent absorption of eight micronutrients and phytic acid from vegetarian meals in ileostomized human volunteers.
Nutrition 2005; 21(6):678-85N

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Apparent absorption of eight micronutrients and degradation of phytic acid were studied in human subjects who underwent ileostomy. The prominent factors affecting micronutrient absorption from vegetarian Indian meals (n = 11) were identified.

METHODS

Levels of beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, riboflavin, and thiamine in food and ileostomy contents were estimated by spectrophotometry and spectrofluorometry. Contents of zinc, iron, copper, and manganese were estimated by atomic absorption spectrometry and that of phytic acid by gradient elution ion exchange chromatography. Statistical analyses were done with SPSS 10.0.

RESULTS

Absorption of beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, riboflavin, and thiamine was 63% to 75.6%. There was a negative non-significant trend in values of beta-carotene absorption with increased intake of beta-carotene (r = - 0.51, P > 0.1) and iron (r = -0.67, P = 0.1) but a positive significant trend with riboflavin intakes (r = 0.84, P = 0.018). Percentage of absorption of ascorbic acid showed weak positive associations with intakes of riboflavin (r = 0.71) and ascorbic acid (r = 0.5). Percentage of absorption of ascorbic acid was positively correlated with percentage of absorption of beta-carotene (r = 0.80, P < 0.05), iron, and riboflavin (r = 0.64, P = 0.086), indicating some common influencing factors. Percentages of absorption for zinc (20.2), iron (9.9), and copper (17.6) was comparable with those reported for soy protein-based, high phytate diets. Pattern of phytic acid in the meals and output indicated partial degradation and absorption (34%).

CONCLUSIONS

For vegetarian Indian meals, apparent absorptions of beta-carotene and ascorbic acid were 76% and 73.5% and of riboflavin and thiamine was 63%. Zinc, copper, and iron showed a lower absorption (10% to 20%).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biometry & Nutrition Group, Agharkar Research Institute, Pune, India. vaishaliagat@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15925291

Citation

Agte, Vaishali, et al. "Apparent Absorption of Eight Micronutrients and Phytic Acid From Vegetarian Meals in Ileostomized Human Volunteers." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 21, no. 6, 2005, pp. 678-85.
Agte V, Jahagirdar M, Chiplonkar S. Apparent absorption of eight micronutrients and phytic acid from vegetarian meals in ileostomized human volunteers. Nutrition. 2005;21(6):678-85.
Agte, V., Jahagirdar, M., & Chiplonkar, S. (2005). Apparent absorption of eight micronutrients and phytic acid from vegetarian meals in ileostomized human volunteers. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 21(6), pp. 678-85.
Agte V, Jahagirdar M, Chiplonkar S. Apparent Absorption of Eight Micronutrients and Phytic Acid From Vegetarian Meals in Ileostomized Human Volunteers. Nutrition. 2005;21(6):678-85. PubMed PMID: 15925291.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Apparent absorption of eight micronutrients and phytic acid from vegetarian meals in ileostomized human volunteers. AU - Agte,Vaishali, AU - Jahagirdar,Madhavi, AU - Chiplonkar,Shashi, PY - 2004/04/22/received PY - 2004/11/09/accepted PY - 2005/6/1/pubmed PY - 2005/10/18/medline PY - 2005/6/1/entrez SP - 678 EP - 85 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 21 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Apparent absorption of eight micronutrients and degradation of phytic acid were studied in human subjects who underwent ileostomy. The prominent factors affecting micronutrient absorption from vegetarian Indian meals (n = 11) were identified. METHODS: Levels of beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, riboflavin, and thiamine in food and ileostomy contents were estimated by spectrophotometry and spectrofluorometry. Contents of zinc, iron, copper, and manganese were estimated by atomic absorption spectrometry and that of phytic acid by gradient elution ion exchange chromatography. Statistical analyses were done with SPSS 10.0. RESULTS: Absorption of beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, riboflavin, and thiamine was 63% to 75.6%. There was a negative non-significant trend in values of beta-carotene absorption with increased intake of beta-carotene (r = - 0.51, P > 0.1) and iron (r = -0.67, P = 0.1) but a positive significant trend with riboflavin intakes (r = 0.84, P = 0.018). Percentage of absorption of ascorbic acid showed weak positive associations with intakes of riboflavin (r = 0.71) and ascorbic acid (r = 0.5). Percentage of absorption of ascorbic acid was positively correlated with percentage of absorption of beta-carotene (r = 0.80, P < 0.05), iron, and riboflavin (r = 0.64, P = 0.086), indicating some common influencing factors. Percentages of absorption for zinc (20.2), iron (9.9), and copper (17.6) was comparable with those reported for soy protein-based, high phytate diets. Pattern of phytic acid in the meals and output indicated partial degradation and absorption (34%). CONCLUSIONS: For vegetarian Indian meals, apparent absorptions of beta-carotene and ascorbic acid were 76% and 73.5% and of riboflavin and thiamine was 63%. Zinc, copper, and iron showed a lower absorption (10% to 20%). SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15925291/Apparent_absorption_of_eight_micronutrients_and_phytic_acid_from_vegetarian_meals_in_ileostomized_human_volunteers_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(05)00093-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -