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Psychopathology following trauma: the role of subjective experience.
J Affect Disord. 2005 Jun; 86(2-3):175-82.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The DSM-IV definition of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) widened the stressor criterion to include objective (A1) and subjective (A2) components. The prevalence of Criterion A2, and its association with traumatic memory and psychopathology, was examined in a large community sample.

METHOD

The presence of Criterion A2 and traumatic memories, as well as DSM-IV anxiety, affective and substance use disorders, were examined in a community sample of 6104 adults with a history of traumatic exposure.

RESULTS

Most individuals met Criterion A2 (76%), with higher prevalence in females (81%) than males (69%). A2 was more common following certain traumas (such as assaultive violence). Excluding those people with PTSD, prevalence of most psychiatric disorders was higher in those who met Criterion A2 than in those who only met Criterion A1. Only 3% of those who did not meet A2 went on to suffer persistent traumatic memories. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders was higher in those with A2 and traumatic memories than in those with A2 and no traumatic memories.

LIMITATIONS

The retrospective nature of the data raises the potential for reporting biases. The data set allowed only one of several possible predictors of posttraumatic adjustment to be examined and only 12-month, and not lifetime, prevalence of psychiatric conditions was available.

CONCLUSIONS

The experience of powerful emotions at the time of traumatic exposure is common and is associated with increased prevalence not only of PTSD, but also of a range of other psychiatric conditions. Traumatic memories may mediate this association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Australian Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health, University of Melbourne, A&RMC Repat Campus, P.O. Box 5444, West Heidelberg, Victoria 3081, Australia. markcc@unimelb.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15935237

Citation

Creamer, Mark, et al. "Psychopathology Following Trauma: the Role of Subjective Experience." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 86, no. 2-3, 2005, pp. 175-82.
Creamer M, McFarlane AC, Burgess P. Psychopathology following trauma: the role of subjective experience. J Affect Disord. 2005;86(2-3):175-82.
Creamer, M., McFarlane, A. C., & Burgess, P. (2005). Psychopathology following trauma: the role of subjective experience. Journal of Affective Disorders, 86(2-3), 175-82.
Creamer M, McFarlane AC, Burgess P. Psychopathology Following Trauma: the Role of Subjective Experience. J Affect Disord. 2005;86(2-3):175-82. PubMed PMID: 15935237.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychopathology following trauma: the role of subjective experience. AU - Creamer,Mark, AU - McFarlane,Alexander C, AU - Burgess,Philip, PY - 2004/07/20/received PY - 2005/01/04/revised PY - 2005/01/10/accepted PY - 2005/6/7/pubmed PY - 2005/9/24/medline PY - 2005/6/7/entrez SP - 175 EP - 82 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 86 IS - 2-3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The DSM-IV definition of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) widened the stressor criterion to include objective (A1) and subjective (A2) components. The prevalence of Criterion A2, and its association with traumatic memory and psychopathology, was examined in a large community sample. METHOD: The presence of Criterion A2 and traumatic memories, as well as DSM-IV anxiety, affective and substance use disorders, were examined in a community sample of 6104 adults with a history of traumatic exposure. RESULTS: Most individuals met Criterion A2 (76%), with higher prevalence in females (81%) than males (69%). A2 was more common following certain traumas (such as assaultive violence). Excluding those people with PTSD, prevalence of most psychiatric disorders was higher in those who met Criterion A2 than in those who only met Criterion A1. Only 3% of those who did not meet A2 went on to suffer persistent traumatic memories. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders was higher in those with A2 and traumatic memories than in those with A2 and no traumatic memories. LIMITATIONS: The retrospective nature of the data raises the potential for reporting biases. The data set allowed only one of several possible predictors of posttraumatic adjustment to be examined and only 12-month, and not lifetime, prevalence of psychiatric conditions was available. CONCLUSIONS: The experience of powerful emotions at the time of traumatic exposure is common and is associated with increased prevalence not only of PTSD, but also of a range of other psychiatric conditions. Traumatic memories may mediate this association. SN - 0165-0327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15935237/Psychopathology_following_trauma:_the_role_of_subjective_experience_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(05)00021-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -