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Silica nanoparticles for separation of biologically active amines by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced native fluorescence detection.
Electrophoresis. 2005 Jun; 26(13):2643-51.E

Abstract

This paper describes the analysis of biologically active amines by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in conjunction with laser-induced native fluorescence detection. In order to simultaneously analyze amines and acids as well as to achieve high sensitivity, 10 mM formic acid solutions (pH < 4.0) containing silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) were chosen as the background electrolytes. With increasing SiNP concentration, the migration times for seven analytes decrease as a result of increase in electroosmotic flow (EOF) and decrease in their electrophoretic mobilities against EOF. A small EOF generated at pH 3.0 reveals adsorption of SiNPs on the deactivated capillary wall. The decreases in electrophoretic mobilities with increasing SiNP concentration up to 0.3x indicate the interactions between the analytes and the SiNPs. Having a great sensitivity (the limits of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 3 of 0.09 nM for tryptamine (TA)), high efficiency, and excellent reproducibility (less than 2.4% of the migration times), this developed method has been applied to the analysis of urinal samples with the concentrations of 0.50 +/- 0.02 microM, 0.49 +/- 0.04 microM, and 74 +/- 2 microM for TA, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and tryptophan, respectively. The successful examples demonstrated in this study open up a possibility of using functional nanoparticles for the separation of different analytes by CE.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15937981

Citation

Kuo, I-Ting, et al. "Silica Nanoparticles for Separation of Biologically Active Amines By Capillary Electrophoresis With Laser-induced Native Fluorescence Detection." Electrophoresis, vol. 26, no. 13, 2005, pp. 2643-51.
Kuo IT, Huang YF, Chang HT. Silica nanoparticles for separation of biologically active amines by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced native fluorescence detection. Electrophoresis. 2005;26(13):2643-51.
Kuo, I. T., Huang, Y. F., & Chang, H. T. (2005). Silica nanoparticles for separation of biologically active amines by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced native fluorescence detection. Electrophoresis, 26(13), 2643-51.
Kuo IT, Huang YF, Chang HT. Silica Nanoparticles for Separation of Biologically Active Amines By Capillary Electrophoresis With Laser-induced Native Fluorescence Detection. Electrophoresis. 2005;26(13):2643-51. PubMed PMID: 15937981.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Silica nanoparticles for separation of biologically active amines by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced native fluorescence detection. AU - Kuo,I-Ting, AU - Huang,Yu-Fen, AU - Chang,Huan-Tsung, PY - 2005/6/7/pubmed PY - 2005/9/20/medline PY - 2005/6/7/entrez SP - 2643 EP - 51 JF - Electrophoresis JO - Electrophoresis VL - 26 IS - 13 N2 - This paper describes the analysis of biologically active amines by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in conjunction with laser-induced native fluorescence detection. In order to simultaneously analyze amines and acids as well as to achieve high sensitivity, 10 mM formic acid solutions (pH < 4.0) containing silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) were chosen as the background electrolytes. With increasing SiNP concentration, the migration times for seven analytes decrease as a result of increase in electroosmotic flow (EOF) and decrease in their electrophoretic mobilities against EOF. A small EOF generated at pH 3.0 reveals adsorption of SiNPs on the deactivated capillary wall. The decreases in electrophoretic mobilities with increasing SiNP concentration up to 0.3x indicate the interactions between the analytes and the SiNPs. Having a great sensitivity (the limits of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 3 of 0.09 nM for tryptamine (TA)), high efficiency, and excellent reproducibility (less than 2.4% of the migration times), this developed method has been applied to the analysis of urinal samples with the concentrations of 0.50 +/- 0.02 microM, 0.49 +/- 0.04 microM, and 74 +/- 2 microM for TA, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and tryptophan, respectively. The successful examples demonstrated in this study open up a possibility of using functional nanoparticles for the separation of different analytes by CE. SN - 0173-0835 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15937981/Silica_nanoparticles_for_separation_of_biologically_active_amines_by_capillary_electrophoresis_with_laser_induced_native_fluorescence_detection_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -