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Chemical discrimination of arabica and robusta coffees by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy.
J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Jun 15; 53(12):4654-9.JA

Abstract

This article deals with the potential of Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy in discrimination of botanical species of green and roasted coffees. There are two species of commercial importance: Coffea arabica (arabica) and Coffea canephora (robusta). It is recognized that they differ in their lipid fraction, especially in the content of the diterpene kahweol, which is present at 0.1-0.3% dry matter basis in arabica beans and only in traces (<0.01%) in robusta. The visual examination of the Raman spectra of the lipid fraction extracted from arabica, robusta and liberica samples shows differences in the mid-wavenumbers region: arabica spectra have two characteristic scattering bands at 1567 and 1478 cm(-1). The spectrum of the pure kahweol shows the same bands. Principal component analysis is applied to the spectra and reveals clustering according to the coffee species. The first principal component (PC1) explains 93% of the spectral variation and corresponds to the kahweol concentration. Using the PC1 score plot, two groups of arabica can be distinguished as follows: one group with high kahweol content and another group with low kahweol content. The first group includes samples coming from Kenya and Jamaica; the second group includes samples from Australia. The main difference between these coffees is that those from Kenya and Jamaica are well-known for growing at a high altitude whereas those ones from Australia are grown at a low altitude. To our knowledge, the application of Raman spectroscopy has never been used in coffee analysis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unité de Biochimie de la Nutrition, Faculté de l'Ingénierie Biologique, Agronomique et Environnementale, Université Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du sud 2/8, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgique. bidget11@hotmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15941296

Citation

Rubayiza, Aloys B., and Marc Meurens. "Chemical Discrimination of Arabica and Robusta Coffees By Fourier Transform Raman Spectroscopy." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 53, no. 12, 2005, pp. 4654-9.
Rubayiza AB, Meurens M. Chemical discrimination of arabica and robusta coffees by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. J Agric Food Chem. 2005;53(12):4654-9.
Rubayiza, A. B., & Meurens, M. (2005). Chemical discrimination of arabica and robusta coffees by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 53(12), 4654-9.
Rubayiza AB, Meurens M. Chemical Discrimination of Arabica and Robusta Coffees By Fourier Transform Raman Spectroscopy. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Jun 15;53(12):4654-9. PubMed PMID: 15941296.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chemical discrimination of arabica and robusta coffees by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. AU - Rubayiza,Aloys B, AU - Meurens,Marc, PY - 2005/6/9/pubmed PY - 2005/8/18/medline PY - 2005/6/9/entrez SP - 4654 EP - 9 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J. Agric. Food Chem. VL - 53 IS - 12 N2 - This article deals with the potential of Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy in discrimination of botanical species of green and roasted coffees. There are two species of commercial importance: Coffea arabica (arabica) and Coffea canephora (robusta). It is recognized that they differ in their lipid fraction, especially in the content of the diterpene kahweol, which is present at 0.1-0.3% dry matter basis in arabica beans and only in traces (<0.01%) in robusta. The visual examination of the Raman spectra of the lipid fraction extracted from arabica, robusta and liberica samples shows differences in the mid-wavenumbers region: arabica spectra have two characteristic scattering bands at 1567 and 1478 cm(-1). The spectrum of the pure kahweol shows the same bands. Principal component analysis is applied to the spectra and reveals clustering according to the coffee species. The first principal component (PC1) explains 93% of the spectral variation and corresponds to the kahweol concentration. Using the PC1 score plot, two groups of arabica can be distinguished as follows: one group with high kahweol content and another group with low kahweol content. The first group includes samples coming from Kenya and Jamaica; the second group includes samples from Australia. The main difference between these coffees is that those from Kenya and Jamaica are well-known for growing at a high altitude whereas those ones from Australia are grown at a low altitude. To our knowledge, the application of Raman spectroscopy has never been used in coffee analysis. SN - 0021-8561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15941296/Chemical_discrimination_of_arabica_and_robusta_coffees_by_Fourier_transform_Raman_spectroscopy_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf0478657 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -