Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Swim-test as a function of motor impairment in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: a comparative study in two mouse strains.
Behav Brain Res. 2005 Sep 08; 163(2):159-67.BB

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease that exhibits motor dysfunctions, such as tremor, akinesia and rigidity. In the present study, we investigated whether swim-test could be used as one of the behavioural monitoring techniques to study motor disability in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced parkinsonism in two mouse strains, Balb/c and C57BL/6. Mice were treated with different doses of MPTP (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg, twice, 16 h apart), and were subjected to swim-test on the third day of the first MPTP injection. MPTP-induced tremor was monitored at 30 min, and akinesia and rigidity developed were studied 3 h after the second MPTP treatment. While tremor and akinesia produced were dose-dependent and the intensity of tremor was comparable in the two strains of mice studied, the latter response in C57BL/6 was significantly lesser than that observed in Balb/c. Rigidity exhibited in Balb/c mice were dose-dependent, but not in C57BL/6. There was observed an inverse relationship between swim-score and the doses of MPTP in both the strains. MPTP caused a significant and dose-dependent reduction in striatal dopamine level in both the strains of mice, when assayed on the fourth day employing an HPLC with electrochemical detector. A significant positive correlation existed (r = 0.94 for Balb/c and r = 0.82 for C57BL/6) for the striatal dopamine-depletion and the swim-score in the MPTP-treated mice. While swim deficit and striatal dopamine loss were long lasting (till the third week) in C57BL/6, in Balb/c mice the motor deficit showed recovery by the second week. In these animals, a significant attenuation in striatal dopamine loss was observed by the third week. These results indicate that swim ability is directly proportional to striatal dopamine content, and suggest that swim-test could be used as a major technique to monitor motor dysfunction in experimental animals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Clinical & Experimental Neuroscience, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15941598

Citation

Haobam, Reena, et al. "Swim-test as a Function of Motor Impairment in MPTP Model of Parkinson's Disease: a Comparative Study in Two Mouse Strains." Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 163, no. 2, 2005, pp. 159-67.
Haobam R, Sindhu KM, Chandra G, et al. Swim-test as a function of motor impairment in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: a comparative study in two mouse strains. Behav Brain Res. 2005;163(2):159-67.
Haobam, R., Sindhu, K. M., Chandra, G., & Mohanakumar, K. P. (2005). Swim-test as a function of motor impairment in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: a comparative study in two mouse strains. Behavioural Brain Research, 163(2), 159-67.
Haobam R, et al. Swim-test as a Function of Motor Impairment in MPTP Model of Parkinson's Disease: a Comparative Study in Two Mouse Strains. Behav Brain Res. 2005 Sep 8;163(2):159-67. PubMed PMID: 15941598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Swim-test as a function of motor impairment in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: a comparative study in two mouse strains. AU - Haobam,Reena, AU - Sindhu,Kizhakke M, AU - Chandra,Goutam, AU - Mohanakumar,Kochupurackal P, PY - 2004/12/10/received PY - 2005/04/25/revised PY - 2005/04/25/accepted PY - 2005/6/9/pubmed PY - 2005/11/8/medline PY - 2005/6/9/entrez SP - 159 EP - 67 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav. Brain Res. VL - 163 IS - 2 N2 - Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease that exhibits motor dysfunctions, such as tremor, akinesia and rigidity. In the present study, we investigated whether swim-test could be used as one of the behavioural monitoring techniques to study motor disability in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced parkinsonism in two mouse strains, Balb/c and C57BL/6. Mice were treated with different doses of MPTP (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg, twice, 16 h apart), and were subjected to swim-test on the third day of the first MPTP injection. MPTP-induced tremor was monitored at 30 min, and akinesia and rigidity developed were studied 3 h after the second MPTP treatment. While tremor and akinesia produced were dose-dependent and the intensity of tremor was comparable in the two strains of mice studied, the latter response in C57BL/6 was significantly lesser than that observed in Balb/c. Rigidity exhibited in Balb/c mice were dose-dependent, but not in C57BL/6. There was observed an inverse relationship between swim-score and the doses of MPTP in both the strains. MPTP caused a significant and dose-dependent reduction in striatal dopamine level in both the strains of mice, when assayed on the fourth day employing an HPLC with electrochemical detector. A significant positive correlation existed (r = 0.94 for Balb/c and r = 0.82 for C57BL/6) for the striatal dopamine-depletion and the swim-score in the MPTP-treated mice. While swim deficit and striatal dopamine loss were long lasting (till the third week) in C57BL/6, in Balb/c mice the motor deficit showed recovery by the second week. In these animals, a significant attenuation in striatal dopamine loss was observed by the third week. These results indicate that swim ability is directly proportional to striatal dopamine content, and suggest that swim-test could be used as a major technique to monitor motor dysfunction in experimental animals. SN - 0166-4328 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15941598/Swim_test_as_a_function_of_motor_impairment_in_MPTP_model_of_Parkinson's_disease:_a_comparative_study_in_two_mouse_strains_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(05)00166-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -