Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women.
Am J Clin Nutr 2005; 81(6):1267-74AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Observational studies suggest that a plant-based diet is inversely related to body mass index (BMI), overweight, and obesity.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to examine the BMI (kg/m(2)) and risk of overweight and obesity of self-defined semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women.

DESIGN

Data analyzed in this cross-sectional study were from 55459 healthy women participating in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Women were asked whether they considered themselves to be omnivores (n = 54257), semivegetarians (n = 960), lactovegetarians (n = 159), or vegans (n = 83), and this question was the main exposure variable in this study. In secondary analyses, we reclassified women as lactovegetarians on the basis of food intakes reported on the food-frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS

The prevalence of overweight or obesity (BMI >/= 25) was 40% among omnivores, 29% among both semivegetarians and vegans, and 25% among lactovegetarians. In multivariate, adjusted logistic regression analyses, self-identified vegans had a significantly lower risk of overweight or obesity [odds ratio (OR) = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.69] than did omnivores, as did lactovegetarians (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.85) and semivegetarians (OR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.62). Risk of overweight or obesity remained significantly lower among lactovegetarians classified on the basis of the food-frequency questionnaire (OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.78).

CONCLUSIONS

Even if vegetarians consume some animal products, our results suggest that self-identified semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women have a lower risk of overweight and obesity than do omnivorous women. The advice to consume more plant foods and less animal products may help individuals control their weight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA. pknewby@post.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15941875

Citation

Newby, P K., et al. "Risk of Overweight and Obesity Among Semivegetarian, Lactovegetarian, and Vegan Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 81, no. 6, 2005, pp. 1267-74.
Newby PK, Tucker KL, Wolk A. Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(6):1267-74.
Newby, P. K., Tucker, K. L., & Wolk, A. (2005). Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 81(6), pp. 1267-74.
Newby PK, Tucker KL, Wolk A. Risk of Overweight and Obesity Among Semivegetarian, Lactovegetarian, and Vegan Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(6):1267-74. PubMed PMID: 15941875.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women. AU - Newby,P K, AU - Tucker,Katherine L, AU - Wolk,Alicja, PY - 2005/6/9/pubmed PY - 2005/7/19/medline PY - 2005/6/9/entrez SP - 1267 EP - 74 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 81 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Observational studies suggest that a plant-based diet is inversely related to body mass index (BMI), overweight, and obesity. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the BMI (kg/m(2)) and risk of overweight and obesity of self-defined semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women. DESIGN: Data analyzed in this cross-sectional study were from 55459 healthy women participating in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Women were asked whether they considered themselves to be omnivores (n = 54257), semivegetarians (n = 960), lactovegetarians (n = 159), or vegans (n = 83), and this question was the main exposure variable in this study. In secondary analyses, we reclassified women as lactovegetarians on the basis of food intakes reported on the food-frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight or obesity (BMI >/= 25) was 40% among omnivores, 29% among both semivegetarians and vegans, and 25% among lactovegetarians. In multivariate, adjusted logistic regression analyses, self-identified vegans had a significantly lower risk of overweight or obesity [odds ratio (OR) = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.69] than did omnivores, as did lactovegetarians (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.85) and semivegetarians (OR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.62). Risk of overweight or obesity remained significantly lower among lactovegetarians classified on the basis of the food-frequency questionnaire (OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.78). CONCLUSIONS: Even if vegetarians consume some animal products, our results suggest that self-identified semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women have a lower risk of overweight and obesity than do omnivorous women. The advice to consume more plant foods and less animal products may help individuals control their weight. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15941875/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/81.6.1267 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -