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Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Observational studies suggest that a plant-based diet is inversely related to body mass index (BMI), overweight, and obesity.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to examine the BMI (kg/m(2)) and risk of overweight and obesity of self-defined semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women.

DESIGN

Data analyzed in this cross-sectional study were from 55459 healthy women participating in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Women were asked whether they considered themselves to be omnivores (n = 54257), semivegetarians (n = 960), lactovegetarians (n = 159), or vegans (n = 83), and this question was the main exposure variable in this study. In secondary analyses, we reclassified women as lactovegetarians on the basis of food intakes reported on the food-frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS

The prevalence of overweight or obesity (BMI >/= 25) was 40% among omnivores, 29% among both semivegetarians and vegans, and 25% among lactovegetarians. In multivariate, adjusted logistic regression analyses, self-identified vegans had a significantly lower risk of overweight or obesity [odds ratio (OR) = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.69] than did omnivores, as did lactovegetarians (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.85) and semivegetarians (OR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.62). Risk of overweight or obesity remained significantly lower among lactovegetarians classified on the basis of the food-frequency questionnaire (OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.78).

CONCLUSIONS

Even if vegetarians consume some animal products, our results suggest that self-identified semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women have a lower risk of overweight and obesity than do omnivorous women. The advice to consume more plant foods and less animal products may help individuals control their weight.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA. pknewby@post.harvard.edu

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Anthropometry
    Cohort Studies
    Confidence Intervals
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet, Vegetarian
    Eating
    Female
    Humans
    Linear Models
    Logistic Models
    Meat
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Obesity
    Odds Ratio
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Sweden

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15941875

    Citation

    Newby, P K., et al. "Risk of Overweight and Obesity Among Semivegetarian, Lactovegetarian, and Vegan Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 81, no. 6, 2005, pp. 1267-74.
    Newby PK, Tucker KL, Wolk A. Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(6):1267-74.
    Newby, P. K., Tucker, K. L., & Wolk, A. (2005). Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 81(6), pp. 1267-74.
    Newby PK, Tucker KL, Wolk A. Risk of Overweight and Obesity Among Semivegetarian, Lactovegetarian, and Vegan Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(6):1267-74. PubMed PMID: 15941875.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of overweight and obesity among semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women. AU - Newby,P K, AU - Tucker,Katherine L, AU - Wolk,Alicja, PY - 2005/6/9/pubmed PY - 2005/7/19/medline PY - 2005/6/9/entrez SP - 1267 EP - 74 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 81 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Observational studies suggest that a plant-based diet is inversely related to body mass index (BMI), overweight, and obesity. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the BMI (kg/m(2)) and risk of overweight and obesity of self-defined semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women. DESIGN: Data analyzed in this cross-sectional study were from 55459 healthy women participating in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Women were asked whether they considered themselves to be omnivores (n = 54257), semivegetarians (n = 960), lactovegetarians (n = 159), or vegans (n = 83), and this question was the main exposure variable in this study. In secondary analyses, we reclassified women as lactovegetarians on the basis of food intakes reported on the food-frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight or obesity (BMI >/= 25) was 40% among omnivores, 29% among both semivegetarians and vegans, and 25% among lactovegetarians. In multivariate, adjusted logistic regression analyses, self-identified vegans had a significantly lower risk of overweight or obesity [odds ratio (OR) = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.69] than did omnivores, as did lactovegetarians (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.85) and semivegetarians (OR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.62). Risk of overweight or obesity remained significantly lower among lactovegetarians classified on the basis of the food-frequency questionnaire (OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.78). CONCLUSIONS: Even if vegetarians consume some animal products, our results suggest that self-identified semivegetarian, lactovegetarian, and vegan women have a lower risk of overweight and obesity than do omnivorous women. The advice to consume more plant foods and less animal products may help individuals control their weight. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15941875/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/81.6.1267 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -