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Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cataract in women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prospective data on cataract in relation to total fruit and vegetable intake are limited.

OBJECTIVE

We aimed to examine whether higher fruit and vegetable intake reduces the risk of cataract and cataract extraction in a large, prospective cohort of women.

DESIGN

Fruit and vegetable intake was assessed at baseline in 1993 among 39 876 female health professionals with the use of a validated, semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. A total of 35 724 of these women were free of a diagnosis of cataract at baseline and were followed for incident cataract and cataract extraction. Cataract was defined as an incident, age-related lens opacity responsible for a reduction in best-corrected visual acuity to 20/30 or worse, based on self-report confirmed by medical record review. Individuals, rather than eyes, were the unit of analysis.

RESULTS

During an average of 10 y of follow-up, 2067 cataracts and 1315 cataract extractions were confirmed. Compared with women in the lowest quintile of fruit and vegetable intake, women with higher intakes had modest 10-15% reduced risks of cataract (P for trend < 0.05). For cataract extraction, no significant inverse trend was observed (P for trend = 0.12).

CONCLUSION

These prospective data suggest that high intake of fruit and vegetables may have a modest protective effect on cataract.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. wchristen@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aging
    Cataract
    Cataract Extraction
    Cohort Studies
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Fruit
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15941896

    Citation

    Christen, William G., et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Intake and the Risk of Cataract in Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 81, no. 6, 2005, pp. 1417-22.
    Christen WG, Liu S, Schaumberg DA, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cataract in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(6):1417-22.
    Christen, W. G., Liu, S., Schaumberg, D. A., & Buring, J. E. (2005). Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cataract in women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 81(6), pp. 1417-22.
    Christen WG, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and the Risk of Cataract in Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(6):1417-22. PubMed PMID: 15941896.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cataract in women. AU - Christen,William G, AU - Liu,Simin, AU - Schaumberg,Debra A, AU - Buring,Julie E, PY - 2005/6/9/pubmed PY - 2005/7/19/medline PY - 2005/6/9/entrez SP - 1417 EP - 22 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 81 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prospective data on cataract in relation to total fruit and vegetable intake are limited. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine whether higher fruit and vegetable intake reduces the risk of cataract and cataract extraction in a large, prospective cohort of women. DESIGN: Fruit and vegetable intake was assessed at baseline in 1993 among 39 876 female health professionals with the use of a validated, semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. A total of 35 724 of these women were free of a diagnosis of cataract at baseline and were followed for incident cataract and cataract extraction. Cataract was defined as an incident, age-related lens opacity responsible for a reduction in best-corrected visual acuity to 20/30 or worse, based on self-report confirmed by medical record review. Individuals, rather than eyes, were the unit of analysis. RESULTS: During an average of 10 y of follow-up, 2067 cataracts and 1315 cataract extractions were confirmed. Compared with women in the lowest quintile of fruit and vegetable intake, women with higher intakes had modest 10-15% reduced risks of cataract (P for trend < 0.05). For cataract extraction, no significant inverse trend was observed (P for trend = 0.12). CONCLUSION: These prospective data suggest that high intake of fruit and vegetables may have a modest protective effect on cataract. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15941896/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/81.6.1417 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -