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Blood glucose awareness training helps return insulin-treated aviators to the cockpit.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005 Jun; 76(6):586-8.AS

Abstract

Insulin-treated diabetes mellitus has traditionally been considered disqualifying for aviation duties, the major concern being the risk of hypoglycemia. This phenomenon may lead to impaired judgment and even loss of consciousness, potentially leading to a mishap. Blood glucose awareness training has been advanced as a strategy to avoid hypoglycemia by teaching individuals to use the appearance of autonomic and neuroglycopenic symptoms as indicators of decreasing blood glucose levels. We present two military aviators with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus who were returned to flying duty in a multicrew aircraft. Blood glucose awareness training was used as a tool for the education of these aviators regarding the early signs of hypoglycemia in order to avoid development of more significant hypoglycemia. These cases attest to the importance of blood glucose awareness training in the return of diabetic patients to the cockpit.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Israel Air Force Aeromedical Center, Israel.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15945405

Citation

Grossman, Alon, et al. "Blood Glucose Awareness Training Helps Return Insulin-treated Aviators to the Cockpit." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 76, no. 6, 2005, pp. 586-8.
Grossman A, Barenboim E, Azaria B, et al. Blood glucose awareness training helps return insulin-treated aviators to the cockpit. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005;76(6):586-8.
Grossman, A., Barenboim, E., Azaria, B., Goldstein, L., & Cohen, O. (2005). Blood glucose awareness training helps return insulin-treated aviators to the cockpit. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 76(6), 586-8.
Grossman A, et al. Blood Glucose Awareness Training Helps Return Insulin-treated Aviators to the Cockpit. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005;76(6):586-8. PubMed PMID: 15945405.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Blood glucose awareness training helps return insulin-treated aviators to the cockpit. AU - Grossman,Alon, AU - Barenboim,Erez, AU - Azaria,Bella, AU - Goldstein,Liav, AU - Cohen,Ohad, PY - 2005/6/11/pubmed PY - 2005/9/10/medline PY - 2005/6/11/entrez SP - 586 EP - 8 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 76 IS - 6 N2 - Insulin-treated diabetes mellitus has traditionally been considered disqualifying for aviation duties, the major concern being the risk of hypoglycemia. This phenomenon may lead to impaired judgment and even loss of consciousness, potentially leading to a mishap. Blood glucose awareness training has been advanced as a strategy to avoid hypoglycemia by teaching individuals to use the appearance of autonomic and neuroglycopenic symptoms as indicators of decreasing blood glucose levels. We present two military aviators with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus who were returned to flying duty in a multicrew aircraft. Blood glucose awareness training was used as a tool for the education of these aviators regarding the early signs of hypoglycemia in order to avoid development of more significant hypoglycemia. These cases attest to the importance of blood glucose awareness training in the return of diabetic patients to the cockpit. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15945405/Blood_glucose_awareness_training_helps_return_insulin_treated_aviators_to_the_cockpit_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0095-6562&volume=76&issue=6&spage=586&aulast=Grossman DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -