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Association between maternal panic disorders and pregnancy complications and delivery outcomes.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2006 Jan 01; 124(1):47-52.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The objective of the study was to evaluate the possible association between panic disorders during pregnancy and pregnancy complications, as well as birth outcomes: gestational age and birth weight, as well as preterm birth/low birthweight in newborns.

METHODOLOGY

Comparison of newborn infants (without any defects) born to mothers with or without panic disorder in the population-based large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Main outcome measures were medically recorded pregnancy complications, as well as gestational age and birth weight, proportion of preterm birth and low birthweight.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS

Of 38,151 controls, 187 (0.5%) had mothers with panic disorders during pregnancy. Among pregnancy complications, anemia and polyhydramnion showed a higher prevalence in women with panic disorder. There was a higher proportion of males among newborn infants born to mothers with panic diseases compared to newborn infants of mothers without panic disorders. Pregnant women with panic disorders had a shorter (0.4 week) gestational age (adjusted t = 2.3; p = 0.02) and a larger proportion of preterm births (17.1% versus 9.1%) (adjusted POR with 95% CI = 1.9, 1.3-2.8). However, there was no significant difference in the mean birth weight and rate of low birthweight between the two study groups.

CONCLUSION

Panic disorders during pregnancy were associated with anemia, a shorter gestational age and a larger proportion of preterm birth. Further studies are needed to confirm and explain or disprove the male excess among newborn infants born to mothers with panic disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Semmelweis University, School of Medicine, Budapest, Hungary.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15946784

Citation

Bánhidy, Ferenc, et al. "Association Between Maternal Panic Disorders and Pregnancy Complications and Delivery Outcomes." European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, vol. 124, no. 1, 2006, pp. 47-52.
Bánhidy F, Acs N, Puhó E, et al. Association between maternal panic disorders and pregnancy complications and delivery outcomes. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2006;124(1):47-52.
Bánhidy, F., Acs, N., Puhó, E., & Czeizel, A. E. (2006). Association between maternal panic disorders and pregnancy complications and delivery outcomes. European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, 124(1), 47-52.
Bánhidy F, et al. Association Between Maternal Panic Disorders and Pregnancy Complications and Delivery Outcomes. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2006 Jan 1;124(1):47-52. PubMed PMID: 15946784.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between maternal panic disorders and pregnancy complications and delivery outcomes. AU - Bánhidy,Ferenc, AU - Acs,Nándor, AU - Puhó,Erzsébet, AU - Czeizel,Andrew E, Y1 - 2005/06/08/ PY - 2004/12/09/received PY - 2005/04/21/revised PY - 2005/04/30/accepted PY - 2005/6/11/pubmed PY - 2006/2/18/medline PY - 2005/6/11/entrez SP - 47 EP - 52 JF - European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology JO - Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol VL - 124 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The objective of the study was to evaluate the possible association between panic disorders during pregnancy and pregnancy complications, as well as birth outcomes: gestational age and birth weight, as well as preterm birth/low birthweight in newborns. METHODOLOGY: Comparison of newborn infants (without any defects) born to mothers with or without panic disorder in the population-based large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Main outcome measures were medically recorded pregnancy complications, as well as gestational age and birth weight, proportion of preterm birth and low birthweight. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of 38,151 controls, 187 (0.5%) had mothers with panic disorders during pregnancy. Among pregnancy complications, anemia and polyhydramnion showed a higher prevalence in women with panic disorder. There was a higher proportion of males among newborn infants born to mothers with panic diseases compared to newborn infants of mothers without panic disorders. Pregnant women with panic disorders had a shorter (0.4 week) gestational age (adjusted t = 2.3; p = 0.02) and a larger proportion of preterm births (17.1% versus 9.1%) (adjusted POR with 95% CI = 1.9, 1.3-2.8). However, there was no significant difference in the mean birth weight and rate of low birthweight between the two study groups. CONCLUSION: Panic disorders during pregnancy were associated with anemia, a shorter gestational age and a larger proportion of preterm birth. Further studies are needed to confirm and explain or disprove the male excess among newborn infants born to mothers with panic disorders. SN - 0301-2115 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15946784/Association_between_maternal_panic_disorders_and_pregnancy_complications_and_delivery_outcomes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0301-2115(05)00178-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -