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Infant and young child feeding in western Uganda: knowledge, practices and socio-economic correlates.
J Trop Pediatr. 2005 Dec; 51(6):356-61.JT

Abstract

In a cross-sectional household survey conducted in the rural district of Hoima, western Uganda, 720 child/mother pairs were recruited using a two-stage cluster design. Infant and young child feeding knowledge and practices were assessed in relation to recommendations and household socio-economic factors. Age specific feeding patterns were described using frequencies, proportions and life-tables. Logistic regressions were done with feeding practice as dependent and socio-economic factors as independent variables. Breastfeeding was universal (99%) with a median duration of 21 months. Pre-lacteal use was high (43%), with educated mothers more prone to the practice. Using a 24-hour recall: the median duration of exclusive breastfeeding was 3.5 months; 10% of infants were bottle-fed; 92% of the 0-5 month-old infants breastfed 6 or more times; 21% of 2-3 month-olds received complementary food instead of breast milk only and 19% of 6-8 month-olds were only breastfed instead of receiving complementary food. Of children 12 months and above, 42% were complemented twice or less and 49% complemented 3 or 4 times. Only 36% of breastfeeding children between 6-23 months received dairy milk. Over 50% of mothers did not know that adding oil to complementary food could improve it. The least poor were more likely, than the poorest, to use dairy milk (OR 3.9, CI 1.6-9.6); and educated mothers were more likely to prepare special complementary foods than the un-educated (OR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.2). Emphasis should be on promotion of exclusive breastfeeding, timeliness of complementary feeding and socio-economic empowerment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Norway. Wamanih@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15947011

Citation

Wamani, Henry, et al. "Infant and Young Child Feeding in Western Uganda: Knowledge, Practices and Socio-economic Correlates." Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, vol. 51, no. 6, 2005, pp. 356-61.
Wamani H, Astrøm AN, Peterson S, et al. Infant and young child feeding in western Uganda: knowledge, practices and socio-economic correlates. J Trop Pediatr. 2005;51(6):356-61.
Wamani, H., Astrøm, A. N., Peterson, S., Tylleskär, T., & Tumwine, J. K. (2005). Infant and young child feeding in western Uganda: knowledge, practices and socio-economic correlates. Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, 51(6), 356-61.
Wamani H, et al. Infant and Young Child Feeding in Western Uganda: Knowledge, Practices and Socio-economic Correlates. J Trop Pediatr. 2005;51(6):356-61. PubMed PMID: 15947011.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infant and young child feeding in western Uganda: knowledge, practices and socio-economic correlates. AU - Wamani,Henry, AU - Astrøm,Anne Nordrehaug, AU - Peterson,Stefan, AU - Tylleskär,Thorkild, AU - Tumwine,James K, Y1 - 2005/06/09/ PY - 2005/6/11/pubmed PY - 2006/2/4/medline PY - 2005/6/11/entrez SP - 356 EP - 61 JF - Journal of tropical pediatrics JO - J Trop Pediatr VL - 51 IS - 6 N2 - In a cross-sectional household survey conducted in the rural district of Hoima, western Uganda, 720 child/mother pairs were recruited using a two-stage cluster design. Infant and young child feeding knowledge and practices were assessed in relation to recommendations and household socio-economic factors. Age specific feeding patterns were described using frequencies, proportions and life-tables. Logistic regressions were done with feeding practice as dependent and socio-economic factors as independent variables. Breastfeeding was universal (99%) with a median duration of 21 months. Pre-lacteal use was high (43%), with educated mothers more prone to the practice. Using a 24-hour recall: the median duration of exclusive breastfeeding was 3.5 months; 10% of infants were bottle-fed; 92% of the 0-5 month-old infants breastfed 6 or more times; 21% of 2-3 month-olds received complementary food instead of breast milk only and 19% of 6-8 month-olds were only breastfed instead of receiving complementary food. Of children 12 months and above, 42% were complemented twice or less and 49% complemented 3 or 4 times. Only 36% of breastfeeding children between 6-23 months received dairy milk. Over 50% of mothers did not know that adding oil to complementary food could improve it. The least poor were more likely, than the poorest, to use dairy milk (OR 3.9, CI 1.6-9.6); and educated mothers were more likely to prepare special complementary foods than the un-educated (OR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.2). Emphasis should be on promotion of exclusive breastfeeding, timeliness of complementary feeding and socio-economic empowerment. SN - 0142-6338 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15947011/Infant_and_young_child_feeding_in_western_Uganda:_knowledge_practices_and_socio_economic_correlates_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/tropej/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/tropej/fmi048 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -