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Lipid transfer proteins and allergy to oranges.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2005 Jul; 137(3):201-10.IA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are relevant fruit allergens, recently proposed as model plant food allergens. No citrus fruit allergen has been characterized to date. We sought to identify and isolate citrus fruit LTPs and to explore their relevance in orange allergy.

METHODS

Twenty-seven patients, showing mainly oral allergy syndrome after orange ingestion, as well as positive prick responses and serum-specific IgE levels to orange, were selected. Natural orange and lemon LTPs, as well as a recombinant orange LTP isoform expressed in Pichia pastoris, were isolated by chromatographic methods and characterized by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionizaion mass spectrometry, and DNA sequencing of the corresponding cDNA in the case of the recombinant allergen. Specific IgE determination, immunodetection, ELISA-inhibition assays and in vivo skin prick tests (SPTs) were performed with all three purified allergens and with the major peach LTP allergen, Pru p 3.

RESULTS

The natural allergens purified from orange (nCit s 3) and lemon (nCit l 3) showed very similar N-terminal amino acid sequences (18 out of 20 identical residues), typical of LTPs, and molecular masses of 9,610 and 9,618 Da, respectively. The recombinant orange isoform (rCit s 3) expressed in P. pastoris (16 out of 20 residues identical to its natural counterpart in the N-terminal region) presented 92 amino acid residues and 9,463 Da, and 67% sequence identity with rPru p 3. Of the 27 sera analyzed, specific IgE to the purified allergens was found in 54% for nCit l 3, 48% for nCit s 3, 46% for rCit s 3 and 37% for rPru p 3. Positive SPT responses were obtained in 7 out of 26 patients tested for nCit s 3, 3 out of 8 for nCit l 3 and 10 out of 26 for nPru p 3. ELISA-inhibition assays showed an equivalent IgE-binding pattern for the natural and recombinant orange LTPs, and IgE cross-reactivity among the purified orange, lemon and peach LTP allergens.

CONCLUSIONS

Members of the LTP allergen family are involved in allergy to oranges, displaying positive in vitro and in vivo reactions in 30-50% of the patients studied. Both orange and lemon allergens show cross-reactivity with the major peach allergen Pru p 3.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unidad de Bioquímica, Departamento de Biotecnología, ETS Ingenieros Agrónomos, UPM, Madrid, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15947476

Citation

Ahrazem, Oussama, et al. "Lipid Transfer Proteins and Allergy to Oranges." International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, vol. 137, no. 3, 2005, pp. 201-10.
Ahrazem O, Ibáñez MD, López-Torrejón G, et al. Lipid transfer proteins and allergy to oranges. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2005;137(3):201-10.
Ahrazem, O., Ibáñez, M. D., López-Torrejón, G., Sánchez-Monge, R., Sastre, J., Lombardero, M., Barber, D., & Salcedo, G. (2005). Lipid transfer proteins and allergy to oranges. International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, 137(3), 201-10.
Ahrazem O, et al. Lipid Transfer Proteins and Allergy to Oranges. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2005;137(3):201-10. PubMed PMID: 15947476.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lipid transfer proteins and allergy to oranges. AU - Ahrazem,Oussama, AU - Ibáñez,M Dolores, AU - López-Torrejón,Gema, AU - Sánchez-Monge,Rosa, AU - Sastre,Joaquin, AU - Lombardero,Manuel, AU - Barber,Domingo, AU - Salcedo,Gabriel, Y1 - 2005/06/09/ PY - 2004/12/14/received PY - 2005/03/02/accepted PY - 2005/6/11/pubmed PY - 2005/8/10/medline PY - 2005/6/11/entrez SP - 201 EP - 10 JF - International archives of allergy and immunology JO - Int Arch Allergy Immunol VL - 137 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are relevant fruit allergens, recently proposed as model plant food allergens. No citrus fruit allergen has been characterized to date. We sought to identify and isolate citrus fruit LTPs and to explore their relevance in orange allergy. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients, showing mainly oral allergy syndrome after orange ingestion, as well as positive prick responses and serum-specific IgE levels to orange, were selected. Natural orange and lemon LTPs, as well as a recombinant orange LTP isoform expressed in Pichia pastoris, were isolated by chromatographic methods and characterized by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionizaion mass spectrometry, and DNA sequencing of the corresponding cDNA in the case of the recombinant allergen. Specific IgE determination, immunodetection, ELISA-inhibition assays and in vivo skin prick tests (SPTs) were performed with all three purified allergens and with the major peach LTP allergen, Pru p 3. RESULTS: The natural allergens purified from orange (nCit s 3) and lemon (nCit l 3) showed very similar N-terminal amino acid sequences (18 out of 20 identical residues), typical of LTPs, and molecular masses of 9,610 and 9,618 Da, respectively. The recombinant orange isoform (rCit s 3) expressed in P. pastoris (16 out of 20 residues identical to its natural counterpart in the N-terminal region) presented 92 amino acid residues and 9,463 Da, and 67% sequence identity with rPru p 3. Of the 27 sera analyzed, specific IgE to the purified allergens was found in 54% for nCit l 3, 48% for nCit s 3, 46% for rCit s 3 and 37% for rPru p 3. Positive SPT responses were obtained in 7 out of 26 patients tested for nCit s 3, 3 out of 8 for nCit l 3 and 10 out of 26 for nPru p 3. ELISA-inhibition assays showed an equivalent IgE-binding pattern for the natural and recombinant orange LTPs, and IgE cross-reactivity among the purified orange, lemon and peach LTP allergens. CONCLUSIONS: Members of the LTP allergen family are involved in allergy to oranges, displaying positive in vitro and in vivo reactions in 30-50% of the patients studied. Both orange and lemon allergens show cross-reactivity with the major peach allergen Pru p 3. SN - 1018-2438 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15947476/Lipid_transfer_proteins_and_allergy_to_oranges_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000086332 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -