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Imagined rotations of self versus objects: an fMRI study.
Neuropsychologia. 2005; 43(9):1351-61.N

Abstract

This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying two types of spatial transformations: imagined object rotations and imagined rotations of the self about an object. Participants viewed depictions of single three-dimensional Shepard--Metzler objects situated within a sphere. A T-shaped prompt appeared outside of the sphere at different locations across trials. In the object rotation task, participants imagined rotating the object so that one of its ends was aligned with the prompt. They then judged whether a textured portion of the object would be visible in its new orientation. In the self rotation task, they imagined rotating themselves to the location of the T-prompt, and then judged whether a textured portion of the object would be visible from the new viewpoint. Activation in both tasks was compared to respective control conditions in which identical judgments were made without rotation. A direct comparison of self and object rotation tasks revealed activation spreading from left premotor to left primary motor (M1) cortex (areas 6/4) for imagined object rotations, but not imagined self rotations. In contrast, the self rotation task activated left supplementary motor area (SMA; area 6). In both transformations, activation also occurred in other regions. These findings provide evidence for multiple spatial-transformation mechanisms within the human cognitive system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Smith College, Science Center, Bass Hall 304, Northampton, MA 01063, USA. mwraga@smith.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15949519

Citation

Wraga, Maryjane, et al. "Imagined Rotations of Self Versus Objects: an fMRI Study." Neuropsychologia, vol. 43, no. 9, 2005, pp. 1351-61.
Wraga M, Shephard JM, Church JA, et al. Imagined rotations of self versus objects: an fMRI study. Neuropsychologia. 2005;43(9):1351-61.
Wraga, M., Shephard, J. M., Church, J. A., Inati, S., & Kosslyn, S. M. (2005). Imagined rotations of self versus objects: an fMRI study. Neuropsychologia, 43(9), 1351-61.
Wraga M, et al. Imagined Rotations of Self Versus Objects: an fMRI Study. Neuropsychologia. 2005;43(9):1351-61. PubMed PMID: 15949519.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Imagined rotations of self versus objects: an fMRI study. AU - Wraga,Maryjane, AU - Shephard,Jennifer M, AU - Church,Jessica A, AU - Inati,Souheil, AU - Kosslyn,Stephen M, Y1 - 2005/01/20/ PY - 2003/01/09/received PY - 2004/09/23/revised PY - 2004/11/16/accepted PY - 2005/6/14/pubmed PY - 2005/9/1/medline PY - 2005/6/14/entrez SP - 1351 EP - 61 JF - Neuropsychologia JO - Neuropsychologia VL - 43 IS - 9 N2 - This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying two types of spatial transformations: imagined object rotations and imagined rotations of the self about an object. Participants viewed depictions of single three-dimensional Shepard--Metzler objects situated within a sphere. A T-shaped prompt appeared outside of the sphere at different locations across trials. In the object rotation task, participants imagined rotating the object so that one of its ends was aligned with the prompt. They then judged whether a textured portion of the object would be visible in its new orientation. In the self rotation task, they imagined rotating themselves to the location of the T-prompt, and then judged whether a textured portion of the object would be visible from the new viewpoint. Activation in both tasks was compared to respective control conditions in which identical judgments were made without rotation. A direct comparison of self and object rotation tasks revealed activation spreading from left premotor to left primary motor (M1) cortex (areas 6/4) for imagined object rotations, but not imagined self rotations. In contrast, the self rotation task activated left supplementary motor area (SMA; area 6). In both transformations, activation also occurred in other regions. These findings provide evidence for multiple spatial-transformation mechanisms within the human cognitive system. SN - 0028-3932 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15949519/Imagined_rotations_of_self_versus_objects:_an_fMRI_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0028-3932(04)00304-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -