Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Traveler's diarrhea.
Am Fam Physician. 2005 Jun 01; 71(11):2095-100.AF

Abstract

Acute diarrhea affects millions of persons who travel to developing countries each year. Food and water contaminated with fecal matter are the main sources of infection. Bacteria such as enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Shigella are common causes of traveler's diarrhea. Parasites and viruses are less common etiologies. Travel destination is the most significant risk factor for traveler's diarrhea. The efficacy of pretravel counseling and dietary precautions in reducing the incidence of diarrhea is unproven. Empiric treatment of traveler's diarrhea with antibiotics and loperamide is effective and often limits symptoms to one day. Rifaximin, a recently approved antibiotic, can be used for the treatment of traveler's diarrhea in regions where noninvasive E. coli is the predominant pathogen. In areas where invasive organisms such as Campylobacter and Shigella are common, fluoroquinolones remain the drug of choice. Azithromycin is recommended in areas with quinolone-resistant Campylobacter and for the treatment of children and pregnant women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CIWEC Clinic Travel Medicine Center, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15952437

Citation

Yates, Johnnie. "Traveler's Diarrhea." American Family Physician, vol. 71, no. 11, 2005, pp. 2095-100.
Yates J. Traveler's diarrhea. Am Fam Physician. 2005;71(11):2095-100.
Yates, J. (2005). Traveler's diarrhea. American Family Physician, 71(11), 2095-100.
Yates J. Traveler's Diarrhea. Am Fam Physician. 2005 Jun 1;71(11):2095-100. PubMed PMID: 15952437.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Traveler's diarrhea. A1 - Yates,Johnnie, PY - 2005/6/15/pubmed PY - 2005/7/15/medline PY - 2005/6/15/entrez SP - 2095 EP - 100 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 71 IS - 11 N2 - Acute diarrhea affects millions of persons who travel to developing countries each year. Food and water contaminated with fecal matter are the main sources of infection. Bacteria such as enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Shigella are common causes of traveler's diarrhea. Parasites and viruses are less common etiologies. Travel destination is the most significant risk factor for traveler's diarrhea. The efficacy of pretravel counseling and dietary precautions in reducing the incidence of diarrhea is unproven. Empiric treatment of traveler's diarrhea with antibiotics and loperamide is effective and often limits symptoms to one day. Rifaximin, a recently approved antibiotic, can be used for the treatment of traveler's diarrhea in regions where noninvasive E. coli is the predominant pathogen. In areas where invasive organisms such as Campylobacter and Shigella are common, fluoroquinolones remain the drug of choice. Azithromycin is recommended in areas with quinolone-resistant Campylobacter and for the treatment of children and pregnant women. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15952437/Traveler's_diarrhea_ L2 - https://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=15952437 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -